Exhibition

The Devil’s Blind Spot: Recent Strategies in New Zealand Photography

19 November 2016 – 12 March 2017

Recent photography by an emerging generation of New Zealand artists.

Christchurch Art Gallery has a long tradition of curating exhibitions by emerging and early-career artists. The Devil’s Blind Spot concentrates on recent photography by New Zealand artists born in the 1980s and 1990s, who have grown up in the digital realm. Today we’re immersed in a constant stream of digital images; with a smartphone in your pocket, taking a photograph and sharing it with friends and strangers across the world is only a click away. This exhibition asks how a younger generation of artists is responding to the new cultural conditions of photography.

Includes work by Andrew Beck, Holly Best, Jordana Bragg, Conor Clarke, Chris Corson-Scott, Solomon Mortimer, Ane Tonga, Shaun Waugh, and Rainer Weston.

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The Devil’s Blind Spot

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Te Puna o Waiwhetu Christchurch Art Gallery has a long-standing tradition of curating exhibitions of emerging and early-career artists. We do this in order to contribute to the ecology of the local art world, as well as because – quite straightforwardly – we’re interested in the practices of artists at all stages of their careers, and would like to bring the work of outstanding younger artists to wider public attention. The Devil’s Blind Spot is the latest in this ongoing series, but unlike earlier exhibitions, it’s concerned with a single medium – photography.

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