My Favourite
Margaret Hudson-Ware's Let me see the paralysed man walk

Margaret Hudson-Ware's Let me see the paralysed man walk

Of the many pieces I love to visit at the Gallery, Let me see the paralysed man walk by Margaret Hudson-Ware is particularly special to me. “Ms. Hudson-Ware” was my art teacher from age 14 to 17 at Cashmere High School. She was a very stylish, bird-like woman – a kind of Coco Chanel in a pant suit. In the eighties, she managed to look utterly timeless; she sculpted her cheeks with burnt umber blush, a colour I could only imagine she’d mixed herself. The whole palette of her clothes and make up was very much what you see in the colours of this work.

Commentary
Caveat Collectors

Caveat Collectors

Extinction has claimed nearly fifty per cent of Aotearoa New Zealand’s bird species over the past 650 years. The persistent myth has it that European settlement in the nineteenth century swept away a pristine past. And most obviously, because we know their names and can catalogue (literally) their infamy, that story includes the professional bird collectors as the cause of those extinctions.

Commentary
Post Hoc

Post Hoc

It is mid-summer in Venice, and the pervasive cacophony of cicada song cuts through the heat and oppressive humidity. New Zealand’s presence at the 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia is housed within the former headquarters of the Instituto di Scienze Marine, the Palazzina Canonica. Located on the Riva dei Sette Martiri, on the southern edge of the island, it is only a few hundred metres to the entrance of the Biennale’s Giardini, with its permanent national pavilions.

Artist interview
Appalling Moments and Abstract Elegies

Appalling Moments and Abstract Elegies

Brent Harris is an Australian artist, well known for a practice that explores the productive tension between abstraction and figuration. By locating emotional content in figures that he develops from automatic drawing, his works frequently express an uneasy human subjectivity. But while his imagery deals with intense psychological states, it is often also darkly funny: monsters of the subconscious, both grotesque and ridiculous, rise to the surface in a process of emotional identification and gradual refinement.

Notes
New Head Curator Announced

New Head Curator Announced

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū is delighted to announce the appointment of our new head curator, Felicity Milburn.

Notes
Cosmo has a new friend

Cosmo has a new friend

This is a new pal for our Cosmo McMurtry. It was made by Laura who's 11 and lives in Auckland. Ka pai, Laura!

Commentary
Te Āhua o te Hau ki te Papaioea

Te Āhua o te Hau ki te Papaioea

The ‘Operation 8’ anti-terror raids in October of 2007 were the culmination of a police investigation that led to the raiding of homes across New Zealand. The raids were conducted after an extended period of surveillance, which was enabled through use of the 2002 Terrorism Suppression Act. In 2013 the Independent Police Conduct Authority found that police had “unnecessarily frightened and intimidated” people during the raids.

My Favourite
Cerith Wyn Evans's Things are conspicuous in their absence...

Cerith Wyn Evans's Things are conspicuous in their absence...

I have never seen an artwork reflect something so true. “Things are conspicuous in their absence” is such an uncommonly heard reflection that it is eye-catching. When things are around us, they seem normal and often go unnoticed; the moment they are gone it can be startling and we wake up.

Commentary
What We Talk About With McCahon

What We Talk About With McCahon

Where to begin when writing or talking about Colin McCahon? I remember seeing one of his paintings for the first time, a North Otago landscape painted deep green with a sunless white sky on a piece of hardboard, hanging at the Forrester Gallery in Ōamaru while on a family trip when I was a young teenager. I felt like I recognised the landscape depicted from what I saw around me growing up, but I hadn’t seen it reduced to something so stark and primal before.

Interview
Looking at Forty Years of Māori Moving Image Practice

Looking at Forty Years of Māori Moving Image Practice

Māori Moving Image: An Open Archive is co-curated by Bridget Reweti and Melanie Oliver. The following text is a conversation between the two curators around co-curating, archives and Māori moving image practice.

Load more