Bridget Riley in her studio, 2017. Photo: Paul Moorhouse

Bridget Riley in her studio, 2017. Photo: Paul Moorhouse

In The Studio

Paul Moorhouse: We are standing in front of a full-size cartoon for Cosmos, the new wall painting that will be installed at Christchurch Art Gallery. How does the cartoon relate to the final wall painting?

Bridget Riley: The cartoon is painted in gouache on paper, but it gives me a good idea of the full-scale image that will be recreated on the wall in Christchurch. I have also made a smaller painting in acrylic directly onto the wall here in the studio. This is complete in itself, and provides the information I need to give me confidence in the appearance of the discs when the larger image is created on the gallery wall.

Continued
Notes
Te Puna o Waiwhetu remembers Cliff Whiting

Te Puna o Waiwhetu remembers Cliff Whiting

He whare whakairo ki te tohunga, he whare kōrero, he whare rangatira.

'The master carver’s house becomes one that is treasured and is revered.'

Interview
Sideslip

Sideslip

Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows recently opened at Gallery and the exhibition’s curator, Peter Vangioni, took the opportunity to interview UK-based sculptor Stephen Furlonger. Furlonger was a contemporary of Carl Sydow and mutual friend and fellow sculptor John Panting, both at art school in Christchurch and in London during the heady days of the mid 1960s. His path as an artist during the late 1950s and 1960s in many ways mirrored that of Sydow and Panting.

Notes
Underworld 2 by Tony de Lautour

Underworld 2 by Tony de Lautour

This article first appeared as 'Painting offers a multiverse of symbols' in The Press on 21 June 2017. 

Supporter
Brent Williams

Brent Williams
Christchurch Art Gallery Foundation

My favourite artwork is Michael Parekowhai’s Chapman’s Homer – no question. It symbolises the strength of the bull and the strength of Christchurch post-earthquake. I’ve been involved with the Foundation since early 2015 and love what the Foundation is achieving post-earthquake. I enjoy being involved with an organisation that is attracting people back into the city.

Exhibition
Len Lye: Stopped Short by Wonder

Len Lye: Stopped Short by Wonder

An exhibition inspired by a flash of light and a thunderclap.

Notes
Want to join our team of Volunteer Guides?

Want to join our team of Volunteer Guides?

The Gallery has an incredible team of forty Volunteer Guides – and we want more! We’re currently seeking expressions of interest for ten enthusiastic individuals to join us.

Notes
Gallery Happenings: Grayson Gilmour

Gallery Happenings: Grayson Gilmour

In early March we were lucky enough to have the incredibly talented Grayson Gilmour performing at the Gallery, supported by the equally talented Purple Pilgrims and New Dawn. I love these gigs, but there is a lot of work to be done behind the scenes to make sure that, by the time the public walk in the door, the foyer is gig ready. The process normally feels like a long, slow marathon with a sprint at the final corner. So here’s a guide to how you too can get the NZI Foyer gig-ready in five (or six) easy steps.

Collection
Bottle
Shoji Hamada Bottle
The term mingei – meaning folk art – was coined in 1926 by ceramicist Yanagi Soetsu (1889–1961) to refer to handcrafts that had been eclipsed by the industrial revolution. Yanagi, Shoji Hamada and English potter, Bernard Leach (1887–1979) all worked to counter the impact of mass-production by revaluing the human touch and gesture, evident in this beautifully crafted bottle. Working in Mashiko, a Japanese folk-craft village, Hamada used local clay upon which he applied traditional glazes. Hamada and Leach visited New Zealand during the 1960s and 1970s, contributing to a local taste for modest and earthy studio ceramics. (Brought to Light, November 2009)
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