Mary Donald John Robert Godley (detail) 1852. Oil on canvas. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, transferred from Banks Peninsula District Council 2006

Mary Donald John Robert Godley (detail) 1852. Oil on canvas. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, transferred from Banks Peninsula District Council 2006

Such Human Tide

The exhibition He Waka Eke Noa brings together colonial-era, mainly Māori, portraiture alongside objects linked to colonisation – it’s a predictably uncomfortable mix. While the degree of discomfort may depend on one’s background or degree of connection to an enduringly difficult past, objects related to emigration and colonisation can be a useful lenses. As relics from a specific period in global history, when the movement of (particularly) European people was happening at an unprecedented scale, they hold stories with a measure of complexity that obliges an open-minded reading. There is no denying that they speak of losses and gains, of injustices and rewards.

Continued
Notes
Art Makes Me Fly

Art Makes Me Fly

Take yourself on a flight of fancy with Wayne Youle's latest exhibition Look Mum No Hands.

Artist interview
A Torch and a Light

A Torch and a Light

Shannon Te Ao is an artist of Ngāti Tūwharetoa descent. In 2016 Te Ao won the Walters Prize for his works, two shoots that stretch far out (2013–14) and okea ururoatia (never say die) (2016). Working in video and other performative practices Te Ao investigates the implications of various social and linguistic modes. Assistant curator Nathan Pohio, himself a nominee for the 2016 Walters Prize, discussed working practice with Te Ao in December 2016.

Notes
Vale Ann Betts

Vale Ann Betts

Ann Betts had a long association with the Robert McDougall Art Gallery and Christchurch Art Gallery. She was first appointed as education officer by Rodney Wilson in 1979. This was when the Gallery developed professionally, with new positions being established that included education, curatorial and conservation roles.

Supporter
Leigh Melville

Leigh Melville
TOGETHER partner

'I’ve been involved in supporting Christchurch Art Gallery for few years now. The Gallery is special to me because it is such a fantastic place. We’ve all wanted to band together, support it and help it get back on its feet following the earthquakes..

Art makes me think. It makes me happy and enriches my life. It stretches my brain to enable me to understand more or to enjoy art.'

Exhibition
Shannon Te Ao: Tēnei Ao Kawa Nei

Shannon Te Ao: Tēnei Ao Kawa Nei

Tenderness and human longing are revealed in Shannon Te Ao’s award-winning video installations.

Collection
The Eight
Cyril Edward Power The Eight
Sporting subjects were commonly used by many of the British linocut artists. Cyril Power had a studio near Hammersmith Bridge and he would watch the rowing teams on the River Thames. The highly rhythmical composition in The Eight skilfully captures the power and energy of the rowers as they pull on the oars. Power originally trained as an architect and he helped establish the Grosvenor School of Modern Art in 1925. Here he studied linocut under Claude Flight and he went on to become one of the most significant figures in the movement. Power collaborated with Sybil Andrews on several London Underground posters.
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