Event

Artist Talk: Laurence Aberhart

Talk

  • Past event
  • Meet at the front desk
  • Free
Laurence Aberhart Kamala, Astral and Charlotte, Lyttelton, October 1981. 8 x 10" contact print. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, purchased 2016

Laurence Aberhart Kamala, Astral and Charlotte, Lyttelton, October 1981. 8 x 10" contact print. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, purchased 2016

Laurence Aberhart has been at the forefront of New Zealand photography since the late 1970s.

Join Laurence and senior curator Lara Strongman for insights into his early years in Christchurch, including little-known and never previously exhibited work.

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Commentary
Laurence Aberhart

Laurence Aberhart

New Zealand artist Laurence Aberhart is internationally regarded for his photographs of unpeopled landscapes and interiors. He photographs places redolent with the weight of time, which he captures with his century-old large-format camera and careful framing. But he’s always taken more spontaneous photographs of people too, particularly in the years he lived in Christchurch and Lyttelton (1975–83) when he photographed his young family, his friends and occasionally groups of strangers. ‘If I lived in a city again,’ he says, ‘I would photograph people. One of the issues is that I even find it difficult to ask people whether I can photograph a building, so to ask to photograph them – I’m very reticent. I also know that after a number of minutes of waiting for me to set cameras up and take exposure readings and so on, people can get rather annoyed. So it’s not a conscious thing, it’s more just an accident of the way I photograph.’

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The Lines That Are Left

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Of landscape itself as artefact and artifice; as the ground for the inscribing hand of culture and technology; as no clean slate.

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Kamala, Astral and Charlotte, Lyttelton, March 1983

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My Favourite
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I spent much of my adolescence in hospital, confined to bed due to a chronic illness. With a 14" TV beside me, I’d travel to imaginary places via the controller of my Nintendo games console. At the time, I couldn’t imagine walking to the letterbox, let alone experiencing the more exotic places of the world.

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Laurence Aberhart: Nature Morte

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