Felicity Milburn

Notes
Te Tāhū o ngā Maunga Tūmatakahuki

Te Tāhū o ngā Maunga Tūmatakahuki

There is a gorgeous new addition on the side of Te Puna o Waiwhetū. Artist Kelcy Taratoa has created a wall work to replace Kay Rosen’s Here Are the People and There Is the Steeple, which was in place for eight years. Its title is Te Tāhū o ngā Maunga Tūmatakahuki (see below for an explanation) and it was created in association with our soon-to-be-revealed exhibition Te Wheke: Pathways Across Oceania. The exhibition’s themes of exploration, belonging and connection were a starting point for Taratoa’s thinking, and he worked with the support of mana whenua, including Nathan Pohio, to ground the work in local narratives that relate to discovery and whakapapa.

Exhibition

Kelcy Taratoa: Te Tāhū o ngā Maunga Tūmatakahuki

A vast painting by Kelcy Taratoa about how we are bound together.

Notes
Nona Hildyard by Richard Wallwork

Nona Hildyard by Richard Wallwork

The incredible work done every day by healthcare workers has been evident throughout the Covid-19 response. Their dedication continues a long tradition of service by New Zealanders, including that of Lyttelton nurse Nona Hildyard (1888 – 1915), who is featured in this portrait from the Gallery’s collection.

Notes
Puta Noa I Te Ao / In the World

Puta Noa I Te Ao / In the World

Artists from Aotearoa New Zealand are often well-travelled. Feeling the distance of Aotearoa from the world’s centres of art, they have often been drawn overseas to study and work, contributing to the art history of their adopted countries as well as this one.

Notes
He Toka Tū Moana

He Toka Tū Moana

The Māori whakataukī or proverb “He toka tū moana” uses the image of a rock that stands firmly in the ocean to describe someone steadfast and strong in their culture or beliefs, who defies all opposition.

Notes
what happens by Jenny Bornholdt

what happens by Jenny Bornholdt

A very special hand-washing treat

Notes
Hand-washing

Hand-washing

As we all know, one of the best ways to prevent the spread of Covid-19 is washing our hands. For the last week or so, our wonderful librarian Tim Jones supplied all the bathrooms at Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū with poems by New Zealand poets to make the recommended 2-minute handwashing sessions pass a little more bearably.

Now we are all working from home, we'll try to keep this going, starting with a reading of On First Looking into Chapman's Homer by John Keats, the poem behind Michael Parekowhai's sculpture. Tim himself is the reader.

Press play and start washing.

Exhibition

Te Wheke: Pathways Across Oceania

Experience the Gallery’s collection from the perspective of our place in Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa, the Pacific Ocean.

Commentary
Power and Possibility

Power and Possibility

Jonathan Jones, art critic for the Guardian newspaper, described it as “a spectacle that displays the power and mystery of our planet”. Made more than forty years ago, Walter De Maria’s 1977 sculpture The Lightning Field remains one of the world’s most ambitious manifestations of light-based art.

Exhibition

Turn, Turn, Turn: A Year in Art

Crisp autumns, icy winters, blossom-filled springs and scorching summers.

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