Felicity Milburn

Commentary
Te Wheke: Pathways Across Oceania

Te Wheke: Pathways Across Oceania

Every few years, the curatorial team at Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū embarks on a major rehang of the first-floor collection area. It’s no small undertaking finding fresh ways to combine long-held, well-known works and new acquisitions, looking for combinations that will offer compelling viewing, immersive storytelling and intellectual engagement to our wide and evolving visitor base. This time, director Blair Jackson added another dimension to our task, challenging us to reimagine the physical orientation of the spaces to encourage visitors to interact with the architecture in a completely different way.

Exhibition

Kelcy Taratoa: Te Tāhū o ngā Maunga Tūmatakahuki

A vast painting by Kelcy Taratoa about how we are bound together.

Notes
Hemispheres

Hemispheres

I’ve had this little untitled sculpture by Clare Noonan on the same wall in my home for more than 15 years. It might even be the first thing I hung there, since we’ve had our house about that long. I bought it at a fundraiser for the High Street Project, and I’ve always loved it, for reasons I find hard to explain.  Sometimes, it suggests a new way to think about the world; in others, it feels like a reminder of something I already know.

Notes
Puta Noa I Te Ao / In the World

Puta Noa I Te Ao / In the World

Artists from Aotearoa New Zealand are often well-travelled. Feeling the distance of Aotearoa from the world’s centres of art, they have often been drawn overseas to study and work, contributing to the art history of their adopted countries as well as this one.

Notes
He Toka Tū Moana

He Toka Tū Moana

The Māori whakataukī or proverb “He toka tū moana” uses the image of a rock that stands firmly in the ocean to describe someone steadfast and strong in their culture or beliefs, who defies all opposition.

Notes
what happens by Jenny Bornholdt

what happens by Jenny Bornholdt

A very special hand-washing treat

Notes
Hand-washing

Hand-washing

As we all know, one of the best ways to prevent the spread of Covid-19 is washing our hands. For the last week or so, our wonderful librarian Tim Jones supplied all the bathrooms at Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū with poems by New Zealand poets to make the recommended 2-minute handwashing sessions pass a little more bearably.

Now we are all working from home, we'll try to keep this going, starting with a reading of On First Looking into Chapman's Homer by John Keats, the poem behind Michael Parekowhai's sculpture. Tim himself is the reader.

Press play and start washing.

Exhibition

Te Wheke: Pathways Across Oceania

Experience the Gallery’s collection from the perspective of our place in Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa, the Pacific Ocean.

Commentary
Power and Possibility

Power and Possibility

Jonathan Jones, art critic for the Guardian newspaper, described it as “a spectacle that displays the power and mystery of our planet”. Made more than forty years ago, Walter De Maria’s 1977 sculpture The Lightning Field remains one of the world’s most ambitious manifestations of light-based art.

Exhibition

Turn, Turn, Turn: A Year in Art

Crisp autumns, icy winters, blossom-filled springs and scorching summers.

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