Exhibition

We Do This

12 May 2018 – 26 May 2019

A recharged contemporary hang to mark 125 years of women’s suffrage.

As Aotearoa New Zealand marks 125 years of women’s suffrage, we’ve recharged our contemporary collection spaces with a high-voltage new hang. Some works resonate with challenge, like Allie Eagle’s defiant 1974 self-portrait – made after spending a long day hanging paintings by her male peers – or Robyn Kahukiwa’s foot-stomping women’s haka, Tena I Ruia (1988). Others claim space more obliquely, with ambition, insight and self-deprecating humour. Spanning four decades, the new line-up highlights major pieces by such celebrated artists as Vivian Lynn, Julia Morison and Louise Henderson, and also introduces several recent acquisitions, including works by Areta Wilkinson, Francis Upritchard and Saskia Leek.

See all the works from our collection that are in this exhibition.

Related

Event
We Do This Feature Tour
We Do This Feature Tour

Celebrate the 125th anniversary of universal suffrage in Aotearoa New Zealand by joining one of our friendly and informative guides on a feature tour of We Do This.

Event
We Do This by Alexis Hunter
We Do This by Alexis Hunter

Join volunteer guide Sara Newman as she discusses Alexis Hunter's We Do This on display on display on the first floor.

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Our Collection: 19th and 20th Century New Zealand Art

Our Collection: 19th and 20th Century New Zealand Art

Our lively new historical collection exhibitions explore Māori architecture, colonial portraiture, early landscape painting and mid-century abstraction.

Exhibition
Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs

Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs

Exquisitely imagined, startlingly strange works by an internationally acclaimed New Zealand artist.

Exhibition
Julia Morison: Meet me on the other side

Julia Morison: Meet me on the other side

Julia Morison's evocative post-quake sculptures and 'liqueurfaction' paintings return to Christchurch for a special showing in a gallery space overlooking the inner-city 'red zone'.

Commentary
The World Tossed Continuously in a Riot of Colour, Form, Sound

The World Tossed Continuously in a Riot of Colour, Form, Sound

One hundred and twenty five years ago, after years of political struggle, Aotearoa New Zealand granted all adults the right to vote by extending suffrage to women. To mark this anniversary, for this issue of Bulletin our curators have written about some of the Gallery’s significant – yet lesser-known – nineteenth and mid-twentieth-century works by women. Our intention is to make these paintings, and the cultural contribution of the artists, more visible in 2018.

Commentary
An Undeniable Promise

An Undeniable Promise

There is such a burden of expectation placed on Anne’s painting, and on the exhibition… itself. I feel, like many women painters that she is being asked to prove an undeniable promise. This is unfair.

Commentary
Representing Women: Ann Shelton’s Dark Matter

Representing Women: Ann Shelton’s Dark Matter

What is ‘dark matter’? For theoretical physicists it is matter that cannot be directly observed but whose existence is nevertheless scientifically calculable –  productively present yet simultaneously invisible. In a similar vein, the everyday phrase ‘dark matter’ describes objects, conditions and situations that harbour unease or trauma. Trauma that is often concealed, repressed, or buried. Both definitions are active in Ann Shelton’s mid-career review exhibition Dark Matter, and they provide a rich point of entry into this compelling collection of her photographic work. These are photographs that bristle with intensity and refuse to let their subjects die a quiet archival death.