Exhibition

Stereoscope #1: Jason Greig

18 July – 29 August 2012

Jason Greig's two larger-than-life oval portraits are drawn from the key characters, Jekyll and Hyde in Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel of 1886, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

Mr Hyde, resplendent with top hat and serpent-handled cane, stares menacingly over at the troubled looking Henry Jekyll MD. Stevenson's novel explores the dual personalities of Jekyll, a seemingly mild-mannered doctor who, unable to suppress his dark side, transforms into Mr Hyde. The author's insights into Jekyll's torment between good and evil have been a formative influence for Greig, who has continually been drawn to representing the darker impulses of human nature through his art.

Exhibition number 914

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Stereoscope #2: Jason Greig

Stereoscope #2: Jason Greig

Jason Greig's two larger-than-life oval portraits are drawn from the key characters, Jekyll and Hyde in Robert Louis Stevenson's classic novel of 1886, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.

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Stereoscope: Robin Neate

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De Lautour / Greig / Hammond

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Helen Calder: Orange Up

Helen Calder's new work, Orange Up, provides a refreshingly bold statement on the Gallery bunker using one of the powerhouses in the range of colours: orange.

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Stereoscope #1: Robert Hood

Stereoscope #1: Robert Hood

Two Year of the Cyclops works by Christchurch artist Rob Hood kick off Stereoscope, a new Outer Spaces series housed within two black frames positioned on the street-side of the Gallery's Montreal Street bunker.

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The Devil Made Me Do It

The Devil Made Me Do It

This first survey of Jason Greig's foreboding, otherworldly landscapes, seascapes and figures reveals a sinister side of the human psyche.

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Coming Home in the Dark

Fourteen artists with connections to the Mainland are represented in an exhibition that explores the dark underbelly of the region's genteel appearance.

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Gruesome!

An exhibition curated by Warren Feeney in association with the Robert McDougall Art Gallery, Gruesome! explores the dynamics of high and low art through the impact of the comic book on the world of fine art. Artists include Dick Frizzell, Violet Faigan, Mark Braunias, Tom Kreisler, Paul Radford, Tony de Lautour, Nicola Jackson, James Robinson, Jimmy Cooper, Saskia Leek, Peter Robinson, Bill Hammond, Jason Greig and Gavin Chilcott.

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Here and Now: Twelve Young Canterbury Artists

Here and Now: Twelve Young Canterbury Artists

The work of Joanna Braithwaite, Gary Collins, William Dunning, Neil Frazer, Jason Greig, Linda James, Grant Lingard, Philip Price, Richard Reddaway, Grant Takle, Bianca van Rangelrooy and Tracey Wilson.

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Otira: it's a state of mind

Otira: it's a state of mind

A short road trip to the Otira Gorge was the scene for a conversation between Gallery curator Peter Vangioni and two of the artists included in Van der Velden: Otira, Jason Greig and the Torlesse Supergroup's Roy Montgomery.

Collection
Blood is Thicker
Jason Greig Blood is Thicker

Back in the 1990s, Jason Greig famously said that heavy metal band Black Sabbath was the thing that got him up and going and wanting to draw. It’s a line that’s often been quoted in relation to his work, probably because it seems to be at odds with the refinement and virtuosity of his printmaking technique, or the venerable tradition of artists in which he works—Redon, Goya, Piranesi. Greig said that Black Sabbath’s music was fuel: “the imagery and the weight of it […] I do heavy, laden drawings, dense. When I hear some really loud guitars it gives me the same sort of feeling.”

The images collected here span nearly two decades and reveal a remarkably consistent imagination, forged in Greig’s reading of nineteenth-century gothic novelists such as Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, and what he describes as the “battle of good and evil” in mid-twentieth century movies. Light falls across blasted volcanic landscapes; isolated figures clutch books or brandish scythes; sinister deals of one sort or another appear to be in the process of playing out. The corners of most of the images are dark, vignetted like an early photograph. For Greig, the past is full of unfinished business. “I guess it’s about wearing your lineage on your sleeve. I reckon that images of last century are catching up with this.”

Greig’s figures are versions of himself, “but I try to disguise it a bit”. They evoke psychological states of alienation and estrangement, and depict life as a long strange journey into the unknown. “My art is about love, lost and found. It’s about dark lonely places, imagined and real. And it’s about the constant naggin’ thought that the end is always nearer. I have dealt with my demons, in life and on pieces of pummelled paper. The road I have travelled has been paved with gold that shines, and with bile that fumes.”

(Your Hotel Brain 13 May 2017 - 8 July 2018)

Collection
Open Here I Flung The Shutter
Jason Greig Open Here I Flung The Shutter

Back in the 1990s, Jason Greig famously said that heavy metal band Black Sabbath was the thing that got him up and going and wanting to draw. It’s a line that’s often been quoted in relation to his work, probably because it seems to be at odds with the refinement and virtuosity of his printmaking technique, or the venerable tradition of artists in which he works—Redon, Goya, Piranesi. Greig said that Black Sabbath’s music was fuel: “the imagery and the weight of it […] I do heavy, laden drawings, dense. When I hear some really loud guitars it gives me the same sort of feeling.”

The images collected here span nearly two decades and reveal a remarkably consistent imagination, forged in Greig’s reading of nineteenth-century gothic novelists such as Mary Shelley and Edgar Allan Poe, and what he describes as the “battle of good and evil” in mid-twentieth century movies. Light falls across blasted volcanic landscapes; isolated figures clutch books or brandish scythes; sinister deals of one sort or another appear to be in the process of playing out. The corners of most of the images are dark, vignetted like an early photograph. For Greig, the past is full of unfinished business. “I guess it’s about wearing your lineage on your sleeve. I reckon that images of last century are catching up with this.”

Greig’s figures are versions of himself, “but I try to disguise it a bit”. They evoke psychological states of alienation and estrangement, and depict life as a long strange journey into the unknown. “My art is about love, lost and found. It’s about dark lonely places, imagined and real. And it’s about the constant naggin’ thought that the end is always nearer. I have dealt with my demons, in life and on pieces of pummelled paper. The road I have travelled has been paved with gold that shines, and with bile that fumes.”

(Your Hotel Brain 13 May 2017 - 8 July 2018)

Notes
Jekyll and Hyde

Jekyll and Hyde

Next time you are passing the Gallery on Montreal Street take time to check out the latest instalment of Stereoscope, Jason Greig's Mr Hyde and Henry Jekyll MD. These two works are part of Jason's Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde suite of monoprints completed in 2010.

Notes
Let it flow, let it flow, let it flow...

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It's International Blood Donor Day... (in my experience, the nurses look a lot friendlier than this ...)

Notes
Jekyll and Hyde

Jekyll and Hyde

Jason's Greig's exhibition The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll & Mr Hyde is currently on show at the Ashburton Art Gallery and it's well worth the drive from Christchurch.

Notes
Number 1 Evil, Number 2 Evil, Number 3 Evil…

Number 1 Evil, Number 2 Evil, Number 3 Evil…

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