Exhibition

Bad Hair Day

4 June 2016 – 28 May 2017

Bad Hair Day investigates the wild and wonderful ways of hair through painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and video. 

A 'bad hair day', according to the Compact Oxford English Dictionary, is a day on which everything goes wrong.

This exhibition investigates the wild and unpredictable ways of hair – and human behaviour – through historical and contemporary painting, printmaking, sculpture, photography and video.

From the satirical to the surreal, and through a lively array of the bearded, bald or bewigged, it also introduces audiences to a fascinating range of artists' works, and to ideas as diverse as the styles portrayed.

Mixing inspiration, observation and imagination, Bad Hair Day is shaped with younger audiences in mind.

Related

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I See Red

I See Red

Through a selection of eclectic, mainly contemporary artworks for the Gallery's collection, this interactive children's exhibition explores some of the strong meanings and ideas associated with the colour red.

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Art Detectives

Art Detectives

From the collections comes this delightful interactive exhibition for children of all ages, encouraging younger visitors to explore and connect with artworks.

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Ape To Zip: Adventures in Alphabet Art

Ape To Zip: Adventures in Alphabet Art

A light-hearted art alphabet adventure bringing together a curious assortment of artworks in an exhibition designed to captivate the young and the young at heart.

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Blue Planet

Blue Planet

Looking at the ways artists have used the colour blue, Blue Planet celebrates imaginative art making and thinking. Shaped with younger audiences in mind.

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White on White

White on White

New for children and families, White on White is the thought-provoking replacement to I See Red. Includes new works by contemporary artists, and works from the permanent collection by Ando Hiroshige, Eileen Mayo, Jude Rae and Peter Robinson.

Postcard From...
Postcard From…

Postcard From…

I learnt a while ago that, at any one time, as many as one in five New Zealanders are overseas – that’s one million of us trying to navigate work and life while holding familial and cultural bonds to this island nation. I’ve been living here in Houston, Texas for the last six months; it will be home for the foreseeable future and, almost inadvertently, I’ve joined the ranks of New Zealand artists who, after establishing themselves in their home country, have moved overseas, if only for a time.

Commentary
Hair Story

Hair Story

In drawing attention to the theatre of personal grooming, Bad Hair Day brings together portraiture and caricature with a variety of less readily classifiable works of art. The densely packed selection spans a vast historical range. And in putting bowl cuts and bushy beards alongside wayward wigs and whiskers, it highlights the sometimes comical aspects of hair, especially when styles are extreme. If wry intent is discernible throughout the exhibition, however, we shouldn’t let this fool us: hair is a topic that easily turns serious.

Collection
The Bench - Of the different meanings of the Words Character, Caracatura and Outrè In Painting & Drawing
William Hogarth The Bench - Of the different meanings of the Words Character, Caracatura and Outrè In Painting & Drawing
The text of the inscription: THERE are hardly any two things more essentially different than Character and Caricature, nevertheless they are usually confounded, and mistaken for each other, on which account this Explanation is attempted. It has ever been allow’d that when a Character is strongly marked in the living Face, it may be consider’d as an Index of the mind, to express which with any degree of justness in painting requires the utmost efforts of a great Master. Now that which has, of late Years, got the name of Caracatura, is, or ought to be, totally divested of every stroke that hath a tendency to good Drawing: it may be said to be a Species of Lines that are produc’d rather by the hand of chance than of Skill; for the early Scrawlings of a Child which do but barely hint an Idea of an Human Face, will always be found to be like some Person or other, and will often form such a Comical Resemblance as in all probability the most eminent Caracaturers of these times will not be able to equal with Design, because their Ideas of Objects are so much the more perfect than Children's, that they will unavoidably introduce some kind of Drawing: for all the humorous Effects of the fashionable manner of Caracaturing chiefly depend on the surprize we are under at finding ourselves caught with any sort of Similitude in objects absolutely remote in their kind. Let it be observ’d, the more remote in their Nature the greater is the excellence of these Pieces: as a proof of this, I remember a famous Caracatura of a certain Italian Singer, that Struck at first sight, which consisted only of a Straight perpendicular Stroke with a Dot over it. As to the French word Outrè it is different from the foregoing, and signifies nothing more than the exaggerated outline of a Figure, all the parts of which may be in other respects a perfect and true Picture of Nature. A Giant or a Dwarf may be called a common Man Outrè. So any part as a Nose, or a Leg, made bigger or less than it ought to be, is that part Outrè, which is all that is to be understood by this word, so injudiciously us’d to the prejudice of Character. ___ See Excess Analysis of Beauty. Chap. 6. *** The unfinish’d Groupe of Heads, in the upper parts of this Print was added by the Author in Octr 1764: & was intended as a further Illustration of what is here said concerning Character Caractura & Outrè, He worked upon it the Day before his Death which happened the 26th of that Month.
Notes
Food for thought?

Food for thought?

This year’s weekly ArtBite programme is about to start! From Friday 10 February, we will again offer a weekly presentation of a work on display here at Te Puna o Waiwhetu. The aim of these 30-minute talks is to give you an art break in the middle of your day. We know you’re busy, so this isn’t a long lecture meant to take up too much of your time. And they’re free. With a new work presented each Friday at 12.30pm, the information will be fresh so you can impress your friends during your weekend socialising.

Notes
A Bad Hair Day for All

A Bad Hair Day for All

A bad hair day is usually symbolic of a period of chaos – an evocative, dowdy omen for what will follow. It signifies the potential for a truly awful day, a day off kilter from the ordinary. Yet despite all the laborious processes and obstacles in the paths of the exhibition team while creating this exhibition, the bad day that threatened to accompany all that bad hair, was not the one that actualised. From conception to finish, Bad Hair Day has been a subversion of its theme: despite everything that could possibly go wrong, including almost literal hell and high water, the finished piece has proven the concept of the ‘bad hair day’ wrong. 

Notes
Chaliapin

Chaliapin

In our leatest exhibition Bad Hair Day there is a caricature of the singer Chaliapin in the role of Don Quixote. Chaliapin visited New Zealand in 1926 but it seems likely that this drawing originates with the film Don Quixote, directed by Georg Pabst, in which Chaliapin starred.

This film opened in Christchurch in September 1934

Notes
Spooky

Spooky

Maybe it's just a Halloween hangover, but there's something strange in the neighbourhood.

Notes
Not in my name

Not in my name

I saw this in Woolston the other day.

Notes
Open House – our opening (and reopening) exhibitions

Open House – our opening (and reopening) exhibitions

It's an open house. Come in. That's the simple message we'll be sending when the Gallery reopens later this year.