B.

St Brendan and the Sea Monsters by Robert Gibbings

Collection

This article first appeared in The Press on 14 December 2005

At just 14 cm tall, the exquisite St Brendan and the Sea Monsters by Irish-born Robert Gibbings (1889-1958) is one of the smallest works in Christchurch Art Gallery's collection, but carries with it some of the largest tales. A rhythmic composition of swirling sea serpents, stingrays and sharks, this finely-crafted woodcut print tells the story of 6th century Irish explorer-monk St. Brendan, or Brendan the Navigator, whose recorded travels were an important part of medieval European folklore, and which continue to fascinate.

Robert Gibbings St Brendan and the Sea Monsters 1934. Woodcut. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Mrs Rosalie Archer. Reproduced courtesy of Reading University Library

Robert Gibbings St Brendan and the Sea Monsters 1934. Woodcut. Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu, Mrs Rosalie Archer. Reproduced courtesy of Reading University Library

Several copies of the Navigatio Sancti Brendani Abbatis (Voyage of Saint Brendan the Abbot) survive in monasteries throughout Europe, the oldest dating from the 10th or 11th century. Recounting Brendan's seven year voyage to northwest Europe, the Canary Islands, Scotland and the Faroes, the Navigatio includes a good number of fantastical events for measure. Sufficient credible geographical detail is included, however, for some scholars to believe he was the first European to reach North America. With more certainty, Brendan's accounts are believed to have influenced Columbus.

Robert Gibbings created this work for a book illustration commission for Helen Waddell's Beasts and Saints, published in 1934, an edited collection of legendary interactions between diverse creatures and early Celtic saints or Desert Fathers. In the engraving, St. Brendan stands reading to his companion monks above the animated sea creatures, despite protestation from his crew. Waddell's translation tells of Brendan celebrating the Mass in a sweet, ringing voice, until his fellow travellers implored him to sing lower. Looking below to "innumerable fishes great and fierce, such as never were discovered to human eye" they feared Brendan's chanting would anger the beasts, and place them all in danger. Accordingly, Brendan "upbraided them for fools and laughed a great laugh", continuing more solemnly than before, whereupon "the monsters of the deep began to rise on all sides, and making merry for joy of the Feast, followed after the ship. Yet when the office of the day was ended, they straightaway turned back and went their way."

Gibbings' work in Beasts and Saints demonstrates why he was regarded the leading wood-engraver of his day. Having established the Society of Wood-engravers in 1919, from 1924 to 1933 he ran the Golden Cockerel Press at Waltham St. Lawrence (near Reading), collaborating on this with others including his wife Moira, Eric Gill and Eric Ravilious. In that time he published or printed (for other publishers) almost 100 books, 21 of which he illustrated. In 1932, his marriage ended with the departure of Moira and three of their four children to South Africa. In 1933, economic woes forced him to sell his press, after which time he relocated to Cornwall, though continued to complete commissions for other publishers. Beasts and Saints dates from this time, and (with Glory of Life, another commission) caused him later to reflect that "My engravings in these two books were the best that I had so far accomplished, and gradually the sadness that I had felt at losing my Press was dissipated."

Gibbings was a colourful, larger-than-life character, a ‘bon vivant' who was also author-adventurer, naturalist, naturist, popular broadcaster and public speaker. In 1945 his appetite for adventure brought him to New Zealand - where he was welcomed as something of a celebrity - en route to two years' Pacific Island voyaging, with another book in mind. Back in Wellington in 1947 for six months to complete text and engravings, he met the artist Russell Clark, and evidently struck up a lively friendship. Following publication of Gibbings' Over the Reefs in 1948, Clark produced a deft illustration of the author for a Listener review, which Gibbings thought "a damn fine likeness", and in a letter from London in 1949 requested from Clark the original, offering "a most elegant engraving in exchange". The St. Brendan print was likely part of that agreement.

Meanwhile, the St. Brendan story has provided inspiration for others, including J.R.R. Tolkien, who published a lengthy poem, Imram, in 1955, and illustrated it with Gibbings' engraving. Brendan's travels also inspired British navigation scholar Tim Severin, who in his 1978 book, The Brendan Voyage, recounted the story of his voyage from Ireland to Newfoundland in a traditional Irish curragh, with construction details provided by the Navigatio, to determine whether a voyage to North America by Brendan and his monks might have been possible. In a boat of ox-hides tanned with oak bark, stretched over a wooden frame, sewn with leather thread and smeared with animal fat for water resistance, Severin and his crew encountered similar dangers and experiences to those of Brendan. Many times they encountered large numbers of curious and surprisingly friendly whales around their boat, but were never touched or in any way endangered by the great creatures.

Related

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St Brendan and the Sea Monsters
Robert Gibbings St Brendan and the Sea Monsters
Robert Gibbings was an early convert to wood engraving and quickly appreciated its qualities. He once wrote: Discipline in art: was that what I’d come to London for? Impressionism was what I thought I was after. I couldn’t think what all this hard labour on wood was about. There was no tradition at the time; it seemed a lot of finicky gouging to get a few lines that might have been obtained more easily with a pen or brush. But slowly a love of the wood came upon me. I began to enjoy the crisp purr of the graver as it furrowed the polished surface. I began to appreciate the cleanness of the white line that it incised: even the simplest silhouettes had an austere quality, a dignity, that could not be achieved by other means. Clear, precise statement, that was what it amounted to. Near enough wouldn’t do: it had to be just right. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age) An illustration from 'Beasts and Saints', translated by Helen Waddell, published by Constable, 1949.
Collection
Promenade
Paul Nash Promenade
Paul Nash was a member of England’s Society of Wood Engravers in the 1920s, and this work, one of his earliest wood engravings, highlights his instinctive approach to the medium. Rather than be tied down by traditional wood-engraving practices of precision and accuracy of line, his mark-making is free and immediate. A jagged, hard-edged perspective intensifies the scene. The waves breaking on the seawall form a series of varied, simplified patterns and shapes. The elongated figures, dwarfed by the wall, intensify the scale of the structure. Nash’s rough and intuitive techniques in cutting the end-grain wood serve to intensify the image and highlight an artist approaching a medium with much tradition under his own terms. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
Article
Tomorrow, Book, Caxton Press, Landfall

Tomorrow, Book, Caxton Press, Landfall

In the decades before and after the Second World War, Christchurch experienced a remarkable artistic efflorescence that encompassed the visual arts, literature, music, theatre and the publishing of books and journals. And the phenomenon was noticed beyond these islands. For instance, in his 1955 autobiography, English publisher and editor of Penguin New Writing and London Magazine, John Lehmann, wrote (with a measure of exaggeration, perhaps) that of all the world’s cities only Christchurch at that time acted ‘as a focus of creative literature of more than local significance’.

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Five eyes by Eric Ravilious

Five eyes by Eric Ravilious

This article first appeared as 'Artist captured poetry in wood carving' in The Press on 11 November 2014.

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Lorton, Cumberland by Tom Chadwick

Lorton, Cumberland by Tom Chadwick

This article first appeared as 'Wood engraving artist finally won recognition' in The Press on 27 June 2014.

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Ruth Lowinsky by Eric Gill

Ruth Lowinsky by Eric Gill

This article first appeared as 'An oblique profile' in The Press on 12 July 2013.

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Death and the woodcutter by Leo Bensemann

Death and the woodcutter by Leo Bensemann

This article first appeared as 'Death mastered' in The Press on 28 March 2013.

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The Magical Wooden Head
E Mervyn Taylor The Magical Wooden Head
New Zealand’s most respected wood engraver, E. Mervyn Taylor remains renowned for his delicately engraved and beautifully designed prints. He was drawn to Ma-ori mythology for much of his subject matter, in particular George Grey’s collected legends published as Polynesian Mythology in 1855. In this work he depicts the myth of the Ma- ori sorcerer Hakawau defeating a carved magical wooden head whose stare will cause death to anyone who looks at it. As with his contemporary British artists, Taylor’s wood engravings were also used for illustrative purposes, and in 1946 he produced a limited edition book of his wood engravings through Christchurch’s Caxton Press – which can be seen elsewhere in the exhibition. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age) 'A book of wood engravings' by E Mervyn Taylor is in the Robert and Barbara Stewart Library and Archives and can be viewed by appointment
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More People
Gertrude Hermes More People
This is the largest wood engraving in the exhibition, and was cut from several blocks glued and clamped to one another. Gertrude Hermes’ interest in the human form was mirrored in her work as a sculptor, and like her contemporary Eric Gill she was able to successfully transition between both mediums. Unlike the hard-edged style of many of Gill’s wood engravings, however, Hermes’ line is sinuous and flowing with various tonal gradations throughout the work. As a sculptor she had a good understanding of human forms, which in More People seem to overlap and merge into one another. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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New Year
Eileen Mayo New Year
Nature was the predominant theme in Eileen Mayo’s work throughout her distinguished career as a printmaker, painter and designer. She wrote and illustrated numerous books on subjects as varied as seashells, birdsand cats, including her monumental book The Story of Living Things and Their Evolution (1948). She was fascinated with the variety of forms and shapes of plants, and her subject in this work reflects the year of the seasons, as opposed to the calendar year, that begins with the emergence of spring flowers such as these crocuses. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Stag
David Michael Jones Stag
One of the striking things about all the artists in The Golden Age is their perfectionism, a necessary quality considering the medium they were working with – engraving the woodblock requires the utmost care and control as a mistake is very difficult to rectify. The quality of printing was also of concern, especially if the artist wasn’t printing the block themselves. The extremely fine detailed lines of the engraved block are notoriously difficult to ink and print: too much ink and the detail is lost, too little and the impression is not crisp enough. David Jones commented: I think in the case of my work, it is particularly difficult because [the blocks] do depend to some large extent on really ‘sympathetic’ printing, they are very easily killed. I do ‘not’ think this is a virtue in them, far from it, perhaps, but it is a fact. The idea ‘only’ just gets across in any case & mechanical process simply dishes ‘em. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Poplars in France
Gwen Raverat Poplars in France
A major figure in the British wood engraving movement of the 20th century, Gwendolen Raverat took an impressionistic approach to the medium. Rather than in the studio, she worked on many of her subjects, such as Poplars in France, out of doors. Raverat’s first wood engravings date from 1905 and, although she received little formal training, she excelled with the medium. She studied at the Slade School in 1908, and in 1915 settled in France with her husband and two daughters. Raverat was a founding member of the Society of Wood Engravers in 1920. She returned to England in 1925 and continued to illustrate books.
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Decoration To ‘Five Eyes’
Eric William Ravilious Decoration To ‘Five Eyes’
Eric Ravilious was an extremely talented artist and designer who excelled at numerous artistic mediums, including wood engraving. He was a prolific illustrator for the private press movement, and produced many titles under the much- admired Golden Cockerel Press imprint thanks to his close friendship with Robert Gibbings (who at one point owned the press). Ravilious was no purist, however, shifting with ease between the worlds of high art and commercial design. Alongside his stunning wood engravings, he was happy to design transfer illustrations for china and even furniture. Decoration to ‘Five Eyes’ was based on the poem ‘Five Eyes’ by Walter de la Mare and was used to illustrate a piano music roll, while Doctor Faustus conjuring Mephistophilis was to be used as an illustration for a Golden Cockerel Press book, Christopher Marlowe’s Dr Faustus, which unfortunately went unpublished. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
Collection
Be still Earth, be silent, be still and be silent
Francis A. Shurrock Be still Earth, be silent, be still and be silent
Wood engraving experienced a revival in Britain during the 1920s and 1930s. However, few artists employed the medium in New Zealand at the time. It is one of the most difficult of print mediums to master, but it is obvious from this work that Francis Shurrock successfully adapted to the challenges of the medium. The religious nature of this work, along with the simple, stylised art deco design and use of line, shows the influence of Britain’s most successful wood engraver, Eric Gilll Born in England, Shurrock received a Royal Exhibition Scholarship in 1909, which enabled him to study at the Royal College of Art in London. He came to New Zealand in 1923 to teach at the Canterbury College School of Art, a position he held until 1948. Shurrock exhibited with the Canterbury Society of Arts and served on the Society’s council. He also exhibited with The Group in Christchurch and with the Royal Academy in London. After his retirement he worked on private sculptural projects.
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Mother And Son
Eileen Mayo Mother And Son
Eileen Mayo has a special place in Christchurch’s art history, not only because of her extraordinary prints and illustrious career but also her tangible connections with this city. Mayo settled here in Christchurch in 1967, having established a career as a printmaker and designer in Britain and Australia. Her British contemporaries included Mabel Annesley and Clare Leighton, both of whom are included in this exhibition, and several works by these artists came into the Gallery's collection as part of a gift of British modernist prints by Redfern Gallery director Rex Nan Kivell. Mayo adored cats. They were a constant source of companionship throughout her life and were regularly used as subjects in her art. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Cabbage Butterfly
Eric Daglish Cabbage Butterfly
The London-based art critic Malcolm Salaman was very complimentary about Eric Daglish's work, writing in 1927: Mr Eric F. Daglish has a place of his own among our artists on the wood, by reason both of his chosen subject-matter and his decoratively individual manner of treating it. With delicate white lines on black, simply informing or elaborately grouped, and some rhythmic emphasis of white mass, he will depict the bird or quadruped amid its wonted surroundings of vegetable growth, so that these shall conform to a decorative pattern and yet seem to happen naturally. The bird may be on the bough, the frog on the marsh, the rabbit on the edge of the wood, but the artist’s graver will be no less concerned with the branch and its leaves or cones, the reeds and the rushes, the undergrowth, than with the plumage, the skin, the fur. And what a knowledgeable master of varied plumage is Mr Daglish […] But how decoratively alive they are! ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Hedgehogs
Eric Daglish Hedgehogs
The London-based art critic Malcolm Salaman was very complimentary about Eric Daglish's work, writing in 1927: Mr Eric F. Daglish has a place of his own among our artists on the wood, by reason both of his chosen subject-matter and his decoratively individual manner of treating it. With delicate white lines on black, simply informing or elaborately grouped, and some rhythmic emphasis of white mass, he will depict the bird or quadruped amid its wonted surroundings of vegetable growth, so that these shall conform to a decorative pattern and yet seem to happen naturally. The bird may be on the bough, the frog on the marsh, the rabbit on the edge of the wood, but the artist’s graver will be no less concerned with the branch and its leaves or cones, the reeds and the rushes, the undergrowth, than with the plumage, the skin, the fur. And what a knowledgeable master of varied plumage is Mr Daglish […] But how decoratively alive they are! ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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The Golden Age
Gwen Raverat The Golden Age
One of Britain’s most celebrated printmakers, Gwen Raverat was a formative figure in the wood-engraving revival in Britain during the first half of the twentieth century. In Raverat’s arcadian vision of a golden age, figures exist in harmony with nature and each other. With its rich hand-colouring Raverat’s large wood-engraving draws parallels with medieval tapestries, detailing a country life in which the trials and tribulations of living in a town are left behind.
Collection
Doctor Faustus Conjuring Mephistophilis
Eric William Ravilious Doctor Faustus Conjuring Mephistophilis
Eric Ravilious was an extremely talented artist and designer who excelled at numerous artistic mediums, including wood engraving. He was a prolific illustrator for the private press movement, and produced many titles under the much- admired Golden Cockerel Press imprint thanks to his close friendship with Robert Gibbings (who at one point owned the press). Ravilious was no purist, however, shifting with ease between the worlds of high art and commercial design. Alongside his stunning wood engravings, he was happy to design transfer illustrations for china and even furniture. Decoration to ‘Five Eyes’ was based on the poem ‘Five Eyes’ by Walter de la Mare and was used to illustrate a piano music roll, while Doctor Faustus conjuring Mephistophilis was to be used as an illustration for a Golden Cockerel Press book, Christopher Marlowe’s Dr Faustus, which unfortunately went unpublished. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
Collection
Flocking Starlings
Eric Daglish Flocking Starlings
The London-based art critic Malcolm Salaman was very complimentary about Eric Daglish's work, writing in 1927: Mr Eric F. Daglish has a place of his own among our artists on the wood, by reason both of his chosen subject-matter and his decoratively individual manner of treating it. With delicate white lines on black, simply informing or elaborately grouped, and some rhythmic emphasis of white mass, he will depict the bird or quadruped amid its wonted surroundings of vegetable growth, so that these shall conform to a decorative pattern and yet seem to happen naturally. The bird may be on the bough, the frog on the marsh, the rabbit on the edge of the wood, but the artist’s graver will be no less concerned with the branch and its leaves or cones, the reeds and the rushes, the undergrowth, than with the plumage, the skin, the fur. And what a knowledgeable master of varied plumage is Mr Daglish […] But how decoratively alive they are! ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Hemlock
John Farleigh Hemlock
The beautiful forms and shapes of a humble weed are given centre stage in this wood engraving by John Farleigh. He had a natural empathy with the wood engraving medium, as can be seen in this work with its delicate lines and contrasting areas of black and white in the background. In his role as lecturer in the book production department at London’s Central School of Arts and Crafts in the 1920s he encouraged many artists to work with the medium. He illustrated numerous books and produced an important manual on wood engraving for students titled Engraving on Wood (1954). Describing the process, Farleigh once stated: The tool has a subtle voice. It will only confide in the understanding craftsman. […] It can become the only living thing about you. All feeling and life; all action and intensity can pass into the tool until the body clouds up and only the point of the tool is in focus. It is then that the tool will talk and all is well. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Resting
Clare Leighton Resting
Much of Clare Leighton’s work as a wood engraver focused on rural labourers going about their lives in the countryside. These works were used extensively as illustrations in her popular books on country life during the 1930s, including The Farmers Year (1933), Four Hedges: A Gardener’s Chronicle (1935) and Country Matters (1937). The skill of Leighton’s wood engraving is evident in this work, where her exquisite and delicately cut lines create incredibly soft tonal variations. The subject is drawn from her time spent in a lumber camp on Canada’s Quebec-Ontario border. One of the most important manuals on wood engraving remains Leighton’s 'Wood-engraving and Woodcuts' from 1938. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Spurge Laurel
John Nash Spurge Laurel
Illustrated in ‘Poisonous Plants, Deadly, Dangerous and Suspect', The Curwen Press, 1927.
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Fox
Agnes Miller Parker Fox
Agnes Miller Parker stands out in this exhibition as an artist who had a natural affinity with wood engraving and ranks among the most talented of her generation. Her subjects were often traditional, featuring living creatures, and her working method shows extreme complexity – particularly in her delicate mark-making with the cutting tools known as burins, creating exceptionally subtle tonal contrasts. In this work, the careful cutting of the individual hairs of the fox’s fur creates an impression of softness. Fox was used as an illustration for H. E. Bates’ book Through the Woods (1936), for which Miller Parker created seventy-three wood engravings. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Carrying of the Cross
Eric Gill Carrying of the Cross
Eric Gill was one of the most prominent and energetic proponents of wood engraving during its revival in England during the 1920s. His training as a sculptor put him in good stead for the medium: scale aside, carving an uncut piece of stone is not dissimilar to carving the surface of a wood engraving block. Gill excelled as a wood engraver. He was one of the most prolific of his generation, and his work illustrated many private press publications. In this work, Gill's strong, hard-edged lines cut directly from the wood engraving block, reflect his training as a sulptuor and highlights his unique style. It was included as an illustration in Passio Domini Nostri Jesu Christi, published by the Golden Cockerel Press in 1926. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Three Bathers
John Buckland Wright Three Bathers
During the 1950s John Buckland Wright produced a number of prints in which female figures appear on deserted beaches. He has given a classical, idealised feeling to this work with the elegant poses of the bathers, the robes on the figure in the foreground and the tranquil setting. Buckland Wright was a significant figure in British printmaking and book illustration during the first half of the 20th century. Although self-taught, he displayed a masterly technique. His detailed work was ideally suited to the woodcut medium. Born in Dunedin, Buckland Wright travelled to England with his mother and siblings after his father died in 1901. During World War One he was awarded the Croix de Guerre for gallantry. Buckland Wright worked as an oil painter, etcher and engraver. He exhibited with the London Group and the Society of Wood Engravers and his book illustrations were done largely with the Golden Cockerel Press. From 1948 he taught at both the Camberwell School of Art and the Slade School of Art.
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Diana and Endymion
John Buckland Wright Diana and Endymion
This subject was reworked for the frontispiece of ' Endymion'- A Poetic Romance by John Keats published by the Golden Cockerel Press, Great Britain in 1947.
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Untitled (Kiwi and Worm)
Robert Gibbings Untitled (Kiwi and Worm)
An illustration (page 172) from 'Over the reefs' by Robert Gibbings, published by Dent, 1948.
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Goats on the Mountain
Robert Gibbings Goats on the Mountain
An illustration from 'The Glory of life' by Llewellyn Powys, published by John Lane, 1938
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Native Fuchsia
E Mervyn Taylor Native Fuchsia
Mervyn Taylor was one of the few New Zealand artists to successfully work with the wood engraving medium during the 20th century, reflecting the medium’s revival in England at the time. Initially trained as a jeweller’s engraver, he made a successful transition to wood engraving, one of the most difficult print mediums to master, and produced work that focused on Māori and New Zealand subject matter. Taylor was born in Auckland. In 1952 he was awarded the Association of New Zealand Art Societies Scholarship, which allowed him to study Māori life and culture in Te Kaha in the eastern Bay of Plenty. He was elected a member of the Society of Illustrators, New York, in 1950 and a fellow of the Institute of Arts and Letters, Linau, in 1953. Taylor held a solo exhibition at the Museum of Natural History in New York in 1954, and his work was included in the First International Biennale of Prints in Tokyo in 1957. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Tauhou Feeding Chick
E Mervyn Taylor Tauhou Feeding Chick
Mervyn Taylor was one of the few New Zealand artists to successfully work with the wood engraving medium during the 20th century, reflecting the medium’s revival in England at the time. Initially trained as a jeweller’s engraver, he made a successful transition to wood engraving, one of the most difficult print mediums to master, and produced work that focused on Māori and New Zealand subject matter. Taylor was born in Auckland. In 1952 he was awarded the Association of New Zealand Art Societies Scholarship, which allowed him to study Māori life and culture in Te Kaha in the eastern Bay of Plenty. He was elected a member of the Society of Illustrators, New York, in 1950 and a fellow of the Institute of Arts and Letters, Linau, in 1953. Taylor held a solo exhibition at the Museum of Natural History in New York in 1954, and his work was included in the First International Biennale of Prints in Tokyo in 1957. ####[The Golden Age 18 December 2015 – 1 May 2016](http://christchurchartgallery.org.nz/exhibitions/golden-age)
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Death and the Woodcutter
Leo Bensemann Death and the Woodcutter
Leo Bensemann was one of the few New Zealand artists to produce wood engravings during the 20th century. He was deeply interested in literary subjects, which he freely interpreted in his unique, sometimes bizarre, manner. Here, Bensemann has based his image on Aesop’s most famous fable, but he has set it in a Canterbury landscape. The foothills and mountains are reminiscent of the Southern Alps and the cloud formations are characteristic of the region’s hot, dry föhn wind, known as the Nor’wester. Bensemann moved with his family to Nelson in 1920, then to Christchurch in 1929 where he worked for an advertising agency. He attended evening classes at the Canterbury College School of Art between 1932 and 1936. In 1934 Bensemann met poet and publisher Denis Glover and became involved with the Caxton Press, with which he remained associated until his retirement in 1978. Bensemann was a regular exhibitor with The Group from 1938.
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Fish
Agnes Miller Parker Fish
Agnes Miller Parker was a prolific wood engraver and illustrated numerous publications throughout her career. She specialised in nature subjects, particularly animals and plants found in Britain. Parker studied at the Glasgow School of Art and was introduced to wood engraving by Gertrude Hermes and Blair Hughes-Stanton. All three artists worked as illustrators for the Gregynog Press in 1930. Parker was a member of the Society of Wood Engravers and the Royal Society of Painter-Etchers and Engravers.
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The Print Collection

The Print Collection

If the question "what is the largest individual collection area numerically held by the Gallery?" was to be asked, the answer would have to be the Works on Paper collection, within which are 2145 original contemporary and historical prints, the earliest dating from the second half of the fifteenth century.