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Ralph Hotere - Malady panels

An introduction to Ralph Hotere's Malady panels (1971), narrated by New Zealand actor Sam Neill.

Related

Collection
Malady Panels
Ralph Hotere Malady Panels

A poem by Bill Manhire was the inspiration for this series of paintings. It repeated the words ‘malady’, ‘melody’ and ‘my lady’ and the repetition, simplicity and strong emotion of the poem appealed to Ralph Hotere. ‘Melody’ and ‘malady’ come together in ‘my lady’, suggesting that deep-felt love can be both a sickness and a delight.

The fine circles in the paintings suggest the fragility of love, and their intense colour celebrates its beauty. Hotere made several works based on this poem during the early 1970s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was widely regarded as one of New Zealand’s greatest living artists. He is represented in public and private collections throughout New Zealand. He lived at Port Chalmers near Dunedin.

Exhibition
Hotere: Empty of shadows and making a shadow

Hotere: Empty of shadows and making a shadow

An exceptional survey of lithographs by one of New Zealand's greatest artists.

Exhibition
Hotere

Hotere

The Gallery marks the passing of Ralph Hotere with paintings selected from the collection.

Notes
Ralph Hotere

Ralph Hotere

Hard to believe two years have already gone by since the passing of Ralph Hotere on 24th February 2013. Unlike many public galleries around the country at the time of his passing Christchurch Art Gallery was frustratingly unable to display any works by Ralph from the collection due to our ongoing closure. 

Notes
Ralph Hotere (Te Aupōuri) 11 Aug 1931 - 24 Feb 2013

Ralph Hotere (Te Aupōuri) 11 Aug 1931 - 24 Feb 2013

Join us in commemorating the first anniversary of the death of one of New Zealand's most significant and acclaimed artists.

Notes
Black Union Jack

Black Union Jack

With the death of Nelson Mandela, the history of the anti-apartheid struggle is being re-examined, including the protest movement that emerged here in New Zealand.

Notes
Rest In Peace Ralph

Rest In Peace Ralph

We're all so saddened to hear of the death of Ralph Hotere yesterday.

Notes
Black Painting

Black Painting

Ralph Hotere's recognition as a Member of the Order of New Zealand in the New Year was a fitting tribute to an artist whose work has truly reflected social, political and environmental issues relating to New Zealand and the wider international community throughout his career.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Drawing For Requiem Series
Ralph Hotere Drawing For Requiem Series

Ralph Hotere’s Requiem Series of paintings of 1973–74 refers to the Catholic mass for the dead and his use of dark, subdued tones throughout the series imbues a sense of contemplative reflection. In this related drawing, flowing watercolour washes are overlaid with precisely executed pinstripe lines of paint creating a striking contrast between the spontaneous and the orderly.

Hotere (of Aupouri descent) was born in Mitimiti, in Northland. A New Zealand Art Societies Fellowship Scholarship in 1961 enabled him to travel to London to study at the Central School of Art. He also travelled extensively throughout Europe. Hotere returned to New Zealand in 1965 and from 1969 was based in Dunedin. His work dealt with environmental issues, politics, poetry, religion, colonialism and racism. The Arts Foundation of New Zealand listed him as an inaugural Icon Artist in 2003.

Collection
Black Painting
Ralph Hotere Black Painting

1969 was a watershed year for Ralph Hotere. It was the year he was awarded the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship at the University of Otago, which led to his permanent move to Dunedin and Port Chalmers. Black Painting is not only one of the first purely abstract paintings to enter the collection, it is also the first painting by a Māori artist to be acquired. In Hotere’s enigmatic series of Black Paintings from 1968 and 1969, pinstripe circles or lines pierce the void of the dark backgrounds. Black Painting was acquired from the 1969 Group Show in Christchurch by Muir, who had studied under Hotere in Auckland during the mid-1960s. (1969 Comeback Special 27 August – 6 November 2016)

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Collection
Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana
Ralph Hotere, Bill Culbert Pathway to the Sea - Aramoana

This suite relates to Pathway to the Sea – Aramoana (1991), a major sculptural installation of parallel rows of fluorescent tubes and paua shells that stretch across the floor. Based around Otago Harbour, the prints show a range of ideas and themes that Ralph Hotere and William Culbert had for the installation.

The wine glass, which occurs throughout this suite, symbolises the harbour and its stem symbolises the ‘pathway to the sea’. There is also text, which, of course, is absent from the installation piece. Hotere and Culbert raise the question of identity by asking ‘No Hea Koe?’ (Where are you from?) and ‘Ko Wai Koe?’ (Who are you?)

Hotere and Culbert collaborated on a number of large scale sculptural works since the early 1990s.

Hotere was born in Mitimiti, Northland, and was one of New Zealand’s most significant contemporary artists. He studied at the Central School of Art in London and worked in France and Italy but lived at Port Chalmers. Hotere exhibited paintings and sculpture throughout New Zealand and made numerous works as a result of public commissions. Culbert was born in Port Chalmers, near Dunedin. He studied at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Art and in 1957 travelled to London and attended the Royal College of Art. Culbert has been making sculptures using light since the late 1960s and exhibits widely in Britain and Europe. He currently lives in London and the south of France and often returns to New Zealand.

Notes
Sangro Litany by Ralph Hotere

Sangro Litany by Ralph Hotere

The Sangro series, begun in 1962, is a memorial to Ralph Hotere's brother Jack, who fought with the Maori Battalion and whose grave lies among those of hundreds of other young soldiers at the Sangro River War Cemetery on Italy's Adriatic Coast.

Notes
Drawing (KO WAI KOE?) by Ralph Hotere

Drawing (KO WAI KOE?) by Ralph Hotere

This article first appeared in The Press on 28 March 2007

Among the highlights of the Christchurch Art Gallery's drawing collection is Drawing (KO WAI KOE?) by Otago artist Ralph Hotere. Produced in 1977 Drawing (KO WAI KOE?) illustrates Hotere's development from his formal geometric approach found in his earlier work of the late 1960s and early 1970s towards the more expressive manner he developed throughout the 1970s and 1980s.