Exhibition

Steve Carr: Chasing the Light

8 September 2018 – 10 February 2019

A beautiful and bewildering night-time adventure.

Chasing the Light is a spectacular and immersive new project by Christchurch-based artist Steve Carr. In a darkened gallery, six large-scale video projections explore the poetics of an explosive display and register the transformation of fire into smoke. Cameras chase the action from multiple viewpoints, placing the viewer in the middle of a beautiful and bewildering night-time adventure.

Related

Exhibition
Burster Flipper Wobbler Dripper Spinner Stacker Shaker Maker

Burster Flipper Wobbler Dripper Spinner Stacker Shaker Maker

A family-focused exhibition powered by the excitement of seeing ordinary things transformed in unexpected ways.

Exhibition
Steve Carr: Majo

Steve Carr: Majo

Steve Carr's strangely mesmerising sound and video projection is shown after dark in an upstairs window of the old house opposite the Gallery on Worcester Boulevard.

Exhibition
White on White

White on White

New for children and families, White on White is the thought-provoking replacement to I See Red. Includes new works by contemporary artists, and works from the permanent collection by Ando Hiroshige, Eileen Mayo, Jude Rae and Peter Robinson.

Artist Profile
Steve Carr: Transpiration

Steve Carr: Transpiration

In Steve Carr's Transpiration (2014), huge carnations hover in half-dozen clusters on the wall. They start their lives looking like balls of cotton rags – white, bunchy, frayed. Colour then gathers at their fringes and grows into a slow leach that turns them yellow, or pink, or blue. The flowers’ inner folds wobble slightly. There’s a more general sway at their outer limits – a kind of peripheral rocking. Single petals peel away, minuscule movements that turn into sublime shocks when you manage to catch one at the edges of your vision.

Collection
Burn Out
Steve Carr Burn Out

Burn Out is a mesmeric, hauntingly beautiful, dirty-romantic evocation of New Zealand landscape—the dense green bush of west Auckland, which figures as the backdrop to a car doing a slow-motion burnout. It’s a kind of perverse homage to a long tradition of New Zealand art made in response to journeys through the landscape—Colin McCahon’s Six Days in Nelson and Canterbury, Rita Angus’s Cass, Louise Henderson’s Arthur’s Pass.

Burnouts are a feature of bogan culture in New Zealand. They’re a kind of performance made with a car, in which you keep your handbrake on while accelerating, causing your tyres to spin and smoke and the car to lose traction on the road. There are hundreds of frenetic burnout videos on YouTube, which usually feature screeching tyres and heavy metal music and enthusiastic onlookers. In Carr’s video, the camera is still and the car turns a soundless arc in the middle distance. No one is about, and the only audience for the burnout is the videographer.

Carr’s interest in material transformation—where a character or an object slowly and purposefully changes state over the course of his videos—is a key aspect of Burn Out. Tyres become clouds of smoke; the car becomes a machine for self-expression; a burn out becomes a work of art.

(Your Hotel Brain 13 May 2017 - 8 July 2018)

Collection
A Shot in the Dark (Bear Rug)
Steve Carr A Shot in the Dark (Bear Rug)

Apparently testing the limits of incorrectness, Auckland-based multimedia artist Steve Carr commissioned a skilled woodcarver to realise his highly improbable carved bearskin rug.

Bearskin rugs during the Victorian and Edwardian era craze for taxidermy were almost a standard feature in British country houses, typically in a gentleman’s trophy room or study. They came to symbolise wild nature and distant lands, ultimately tamed. Carr’s project, however, has little to do with tameness, either in conception or in its surprisingly lifelike growling effect

(Beasts, 2015)