Exhibition

Burster Flipper Wobbler Dripper Spinner Stacker Shaker Maker

15 February – 28 September 2014

A family-focused exhibition powered by the excitement of seeing ordinary things transformed in unexpected ways.

Christchurch Art Gallery's latest exhibition explores the shape-shifting, experimental and seriously playful work of making art. Artists from near and far test the limits of their materials with morphing pencil sculptures, stretchy paint skins, gravity-defying stacks and videos of exploding paint-balloons. Featuring works by Rebecca Baumann, Mark Braunias/Jill Kennedy, Judy Darragh, Steve Carr, Lionel Bawden, John Hurrell, Tony Bond, Helen Calder, John Nicholson and Miranda Parkes, the exhibition is supported by a lively and engaging programme for both children and adults that includes floor talks, workshops and publications.

Find out more about ArtBox

Exhibition number 967

  • Location: ArtBox
  • Exhibition number: 967
  • Exhibition Supporters
    CPIT
  • Exhibition Supporters
    State
  • Exhibition Supporters
    ArtBox

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