Justin Paton

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Seeking stillness in movement

Seeking stillness in movement

Time didn't feel like it was on my side on the day I first saw Daniel Crooks's film Static No.12 (seek stillness in movement) (2009–10). In Sydney for just a couple of days to see the Biennale, I'd committed the cardinal mistake of the international art tourist and bitten off more culture than I had time to chew. By the time I reached Cockatoo Island and its dozens of exhibits, I was suffering from what might be called the Grumpiness of the Long-Distance Art Watcher – a state in which one doesn't absorb the artworks so much as check them off, feeling simultaneously fretful about my dwindling time and resentful about the sheer quantity of art. Though I hardly knew it then, this was the perfect state in which to test Crooks's video – a work that attempts, like no other I know, to induce an altered sense of time.

Artist interview
The fault is ours: Joseph Becker on Lebbeus Woods

The fault is ours: Joseph Becker on Lebbeus Woods

There was a packed auditorium at CPIT in Christchurch this August when visiting San Francisco Museum of Modern Art curator Joseph Becker delivered a lecture on architect Lebbeus Woods. And it wasn't hard to guess why. In addition to many other achievements, Woods is renowned for his highly speculative project, Inhabiting the Quake. Senior curator Justin Paton spoke to Becker about Lebbeus Woods, and what Christchurch might learn from him.

Notes
Pop, tick, slap, snap...

Pop, tick, slap, snap...

And those are some of the sounds you'll hear inside the ArtBox, when you step up to the screens and trigger some of the sixty performances recorded by Phil Dadson and sonicsfromscratch as part of the Bodytok project... With the SCAPE Biennial launching tonight, Bodytok's now officially open for business.

Notes
Ping!

Ping!

That's the sound the colours are making at the corner of St Asaph and Madras, where the Christchurch Art Gallery/SCAPE ArtBox is now fully wrapped in its high-key Bodytok 'skins'. (Love that first hit of pink -- seen through Parsons, past Trusttum -- in the long view travelling west...)

Notes
Ouch

Ouch

That looks like it hurts...

Notes
What's in the box?

What's in the box?

Nothing yet, and it looks very good that way.

Notes
Now you're talking

Now you're talking

The vinyl skins are going on, down at our new Outer Space in the ArtBox complex.

Notes
A book in the hand

A book in the hand

E-readers! Kindles! Digital publishing! Okay, whatever, calm down. Here's a lovely new slice of analogue publishing: the book of Bill Culbert's Venice project.

Notes
Fresh from The Matrix

Fresh from The Matrix

Right on time for the opening at 209 Tuam Street tonight of the Glen Hayward/Yvonne Todd combo White Collar, the courier's just dropped off a box of City Gallery's fresh-from-the-printer catalogues about Glen's work.

Artist interview
Gregor Kregar: Reflective Lullaby

Gregor Kregar: Reflective Lullaby

Justin Paton: As everyone who has seen your works at Christchurch Airport will know, you often make big sculptures with a geometric quality. Gnomes, however large, aren't the first things viewers might expect you to be interested in. What's the appeal of these figures for you?
Gregor Kregar: I'm interested reinterpreting mundane objects, shapes, situations or materials. In my large geometric works I do this by creating complex structures out of basic shapes—triangles, squares, pentagons and hexagons. And with the gnomes I am interested in how something that is usually made out of plastic or concrete and is associated with a low, kitsch aesthetic can be transformed into an arresting monumental sculpture.

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