Exhibition

A Bad Hair Day for All

A Bad Hair Day for All

A bad hair day is usually symbolic of a period of chaos – an evocative, dowdy omen for what will follow. It signifies the potential for a truly awful day, a day off kilter from the ordinary. Yet despite all the laborious processes and obstacles in the paths of the exhibition team while creating this exhibition, the bad day that threatened to accompany all that bad hair, was not the one that actualised. From conception to finish, Bad Hair Day has been a subversion of its theme: despite everything that could possibly go wrong, including almost literal hell and high water, the finished piece has proven the concept of the ‘bad hair day’ wrong. 

#mygreatbritten

#mygreatbritten

We’re extremely pleased to have Billy Apple’s GREAT BRITTEN! exhibition at the Gallery. A celebration of the ingenuity of the bike’s builder, John Britten, that blurs the line between life and art, it’s drawing bike lovers and art lovers alike into the Gallery in droves. And it’s pretty clear that, although not everyone is up for building a superbike in their garage, lots of you really love your wheels.

 

World-famous Britten superbike comes to the Gallery

World-famous Britten superbike comes to the Gallery

The record-setting superbike that stunned the world is coming to the Gallery as part of a new exhibition by acclaimed artist Billy Apple, with a special sneak-peek event happening this Thursday 14 July.

Largest ever Fiona Pardington exhibition opens in Christchurch

Largest ever Fiona Pardington exhibition opens in Christchurch

Death, sex, flesh and the female gaze are among the many themes explored in the Gallery’s newest exhibition, Fiona Pardington: A Beautiful Hesitation.

Chaliapin

Chaliapin

In our leatest exhibition Bad Hair Day there is a caricature of the singer Chaliapin in the role of Don Quixote. Chaliapin visited New Zealand in 1926 but it seems likely that this drawing originates with the film Don Quixote, directed by Georg Pabst, in which Chaliapin starred.

This film opened in Christchurch in September 1934

Face Five

Face Five

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in our latest outdoor installation. Quasi, a five-metre-tall sculpture of the artist's hand and facial features, was unveiled this morning on the Gallery's rooftop, next to Gloucester Street.

Holy Exploding Eyefuls, Batman

Holy Exploding Eyefuls, Batman

Back when we were installing his work as part of Burster Flipper Wobbler Dripper Spinner Stacker Shaker Maker at the Art Box, I mentioned that Mark Braunias had been working on a longterm project involving a creative re-imaginging of encyclopaedia imagery. The latest iteration of this work is currently on display in Anti-Groovy at Jonathan Smart Gallery, and it's definitely worth a look, or twelve.

Spotting Dad

Spotting Dad

When Caroline first found out about the David Cook: Meet Me in the Square exhibition through the Gallery's Facebook page before it opened, she had an inkling that she might see her father in the show.

Catch the Bus Into Town

Catch the Bus Into Town

Megan made a special trip to the David Cook: Meet Me in the Square exhibition last week after seeing a photograph in The Press of her and her friend at the Cathedral Square bus stop, taken in 1984.

Out of Place – when the rules no longer apply

Out of Place – when the rules no longer apply

Four artists with Christchurch connections consider what's possible when the usual rules around our relationship with structure no longer apply, in the latest exhibition in our Rolling Maul series.

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