B.

It's coming here

Behind the scenes

Yes it is.

Michael Parekowhai Chapman's Homer 2011. Bronze, stainless steel, two pieces: 2510 x 2710 x 1750mm, 560 x 870 x 370mm. Photo: Michael Hall

Michael Parekowhai Chapman's Homer 2011. Bronze, stainless steel, two pieces: 2510 x 2710 x 1750mm, 560 x 870 x 370mm. Photo: Michael Hall

Michael Parekowhai's Venice project, On first looking into Chapman's Homer. You can see it in Venice here, and see it at Christchurch Art Gallery round 1 June 2012 – one year on from its launch in Europe.

We can't wait. Well actually, we can, we're used to waiting. But how good will it be to have Michael's pianos weighing in – and ringing out – in the reopened Christchurch Art Gallery.

Related

Exhibition
Michael Parekowhai: On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer

Michael Parekowhai: On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer

Michael Parekowhai's spectacular Venice Biennale installation returns home for its first post-Biennale showing in New Zealand.

Collection
Chapman's Homer
Michael Parekowhai Chapman's Homer

When 'Chapman’s Homer' was exhibited at the edge of the devastated central city in 2012, it was positioned between ruin and rebuild just outside the cordon in an empty lot on Madras Street. Our bull stood beside his seated brother while a red carved Steinway piano was played upstairs in an adjacent building. Over thirty days, Parekowhai’s work caught the public imagination as a symbol of the resilience of local people. At once strong and refined, a brutal force of nature and a dynamic work of culture, Chapman’s Homer resonated with local audiences. Subsequently, a public fundraising campaign kept the bull in Christchurch.

Chapman’s Homer was first exhibited in Venice, where Parekowhai represented New Zealand at the 2011 Venice Biennale. It travelled to Christchurch after being shown at the Musée de quai Branly in Paris. Over the past year, we’ve shown it at a number of sites around the city as part of the Gallery's Outer Spaces programme, including Worcester Boulevard, Placemakers Riccarton, New Regent Street, and most recently at Christchurch International Airport. And now the bull is back – standing strong in its permanent home at Te Puna o Waiwhetu Christchurch Art Gallery, welcoming visitors to our reopening exhibitions.

(December 2015)