Vitamin 3-D: New Perspectives in Sculpture and Installation

Various
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ISBN: 978-0-7148-6857-8

Soft cover book

An essential blend of sculpture and installation made by some of today’s most influential artists from around the globe. Featuring 117 established and emerging artists, including Francis Upritchard. 

Author: Various

Pages: 352

Dimensions: 250 x 290 mm

Imprint: Phaidon


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Collection
rainwob ii
Francis Upritchard rainwob ii

The work on the three tables at the centre of this room is part of a series of sculptures artist Francis Upritchard has described as “an attempt at an unsuccessful utopia”. Like the flipped-back word in its title, it seems to set off in one direction – towards a kind of visionary, psychedelic paradise – but overturns our expectations to arrive somewhere much less certain. Locked away in intensely private reveries, the delicate, marionette-like figures that inhabit it are curiously enigmatic: part-primeval bog people, part-countercultural prophets, they live out their radiant existences somewhere between the ancient unknowable past and the distant unknowable future.

(Unseen: The Changing Collection, 18 December 2015 – 19 June 2016)

Collection
Wife
Francis Upritchard Wife

Francis Upritchard’s baboon-ish Husband and Wife are like animals from an imaginary zoo, though their expressions may have been borrowed from the human visitors who come to stare at the beasts. Husband, absorbed with his own cleverness, does not mind such attention; Wife seems less comfortable, cringing under the viewers’ gaze.

Based in London, Upritchard is a sculpture graduate (1998) from the University of Canterbury’s School of Fine Arts. Since her first exhibition in London in 2000, she has shown in many different parts of the world.

(Beasts, 2015)

Collection
Husband
Francis Upritchard Husband

Francis Upritchard’s baboon-ish Husband and Wife are like animals from an imaginary zoo, though their expressions may have been borrowed from the human visitors who come to stare at the beasts. Husband, absorbed with his own cleverness, does not mind such attention; Wife seems less comfortable, cringing under the viewers’ gaze.

Based in London, Upritchard is a sculpture graduate (1998) from the University of Canterbury’s School of Fine Arts. Since her first exhibition in London in 2000, she has shown in many different parts of the world.

(Beasts, 2015)

Exhibition
Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs

Francis Upritchard: Jealous Saboteurs

Exquisitely imagined, startlingly strange works by an internationally acclaimed New Zealand artist.

Exhibition
Unseen: The Changing Collection

Unseen: The Changing Collection

A selection of exciting recent additions to Christchurch's public art collection.  

Artist interview
Not Quite Human

Not Quite Human

Lara Strongman: The title of your new work for the Gallery is Quasi. Why did you call it that?

Ronnie van Hout: Initially it was a working title. Because the work would be outside the Gallery, on the roof, I was thinking of Quasimodo, from Victor Hugo’s The Hunchback of Notre-Dame. I was coming out of a show and research around the idea of the freak, the outsider and things that are rejected—thinking about how even things that are rejected have a relationship to whatever they’ve been rejected by. And I called it Quasi, because it’s a human form that’s not quite human as well. The idea of something that resembles a human but is not quite human.

Exhibition
Ronnie van Hout: Quasi

Ronnie van Hout: Quasi

A giant new sculpture on the Gallery roof by Ronnie van Hout.

Notes
Face Five

Face Five

Christchurch-born and internationally renowned artist Ronnie van Hout has had a huge hand in our latest outdoor installation. Quasi, a five-metre-tall sculpture of the artist's hand and facial features, was unveiled this morning on the Gallery's rooftop, next to Gloucester Street.