Shape and Pattern in Art

Various
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Boxed card set containing twelve greeting cards with envelopes. All works are  from the Collection of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū. 

Author: Various

Dimensions: 150 x 190 x 50mm

Imprint: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū


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