Daniel Crooks: everywhere instantly

Justin Paton et al.
$19.99 Buy Now Shipping Info

ISBN: 978-1-877375-17-0

Soft cover book

This cleverly designed paperback book with an expanding cover explores Daniel Crooks's fascinating compelling video works.

At a moment when much has been said about the possibilities of video and new media art, Crooks simultaneously takes us back to cinema's origins in the time-and-motion experiments of Marey and the Lumire brothers, and propels video art forward into exciting new territory. Author Justin Paton describes how Crooks's works seem to carry us through space and time in multiple directions at once.

This book was made possible with the support of Arts Victoria and Christchurch City Council.

Author: Justin Paton et al.

Features: Fold out cover

Pages: 90

Dimensions: 260 x 212mm

Imprint: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū


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