B.188

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ISBN: 1176-0540

Magazine

In this issue of Bulletin we feature a new interview with artist Bridget Riley, who talks with Paul Moorhouse, senior curator at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Moorhouse visited Riley in her East London studio earlier this year, and discussed the development of her new work for Christchurch. And Sally Blundell investigates the University of Canterbury’s relationship with the Len Lye Foundation and the development of a ten-metre version of Lye’s Blade from the early 1970s

Accompanying our beautiful exhibition Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows, curator Peter Vangioni talks to UK-based artist Stephen Furlonger, who was a friend and contemporary of Carl Sydow’s. Furlonger discusses the London expatriate art scene, and the sense of potential that drew artists there. Also looking at a sense of potential, architect and educator Rau Hoskins investigates the Christchurch rebuild, seeking a Māori presence in our new built landscape, and finds the expression of iwi and hapū cultural identity across the city in some very successful signature projects. And writer and curator Balamohan Shingade talks to Bush about religion, spirituality, and the rituals she observes from her Dunedin studio. There’s crime too – Nick Spill, formerly a curator at the National Art Gallery and latterly a bodyguard and private investigator in Miami, lifts the lid on a little-known art heist here in Christchurch.

My Favourite comes from Murray Horton, who remembers Tony Fomison the political man; and this quarter’s Postcard is from photographer Ben Cauchi in Berlin. Mark Braunias provides the thirty-third instalment in our Pagework series.

Pages: 64

Dimensions: 265 x 215mm

Imprint: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu


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Arriving in London in 1909, the Christchurch-born and trained Raymond McIntyre soon gained a reputation there for his small, pared-back landscapes and studies of female heads, painted in an elegant, simplified, Japanese woodblock inspired style. These three paintings were modelled on an actor and dancer who became his principal muse from 1912, sometimes mentioned in his letters home: “The girl who is sitting for me a lot now, Sylvia Constance Cavendish… has a very refined interesting pale face… I have done some very good work from her… she is quite a find.”

McIntyre died in London in 1933. Seven of his works were given by his family between 1938 and 1991.

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Sydow: Tomorrow Never Knows

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Sometimes I feel inordinately proud of this gallery and especially of my colleagues. I wonder if it’s unreasonable or otherwise questionable. However, as I write, I don’t think so.

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Bridget Riley: The cartoon is painted in gouache on paper, but it gives me a good idea of the full-scale image that will be recreated on the wall in Christchurch. I have also made a smaller painting in acrylic directly onto the wall here in the studio. This is complete in itself, and provides the information I need to give me confidence in the appearance of the discs when the larger image is created on the gallery wall.

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