B.192

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ISBN: 1176-0540

Magazine

This issue of Bulletin features cover artwork created specifically for the magazine by artist Tony de Lautour. 

We have a focus on some significant but under-exposed works from our collection, selected by our curators to highlight the one hundred and twenty-fifth anniversary of Aotearoa New Zealand’s decision, after years of political struggle, to grant the right to vote to all adults by extending suffrage to women. We also hear from Sara Devine of New York’s Brooklyn Museum, who looks at the museum’s ASK Brooklyn app and the direct changes that an improved understanding of an institution’s audiences can inspire. Gallery curator Peter Vangioni looks at a rarely seen work by one of this country’s best-known artists— Rita Angus. Gasworks is a new loan to the Gallery, generously made by the family who have owned this key work since the early 1940s. And our senior curator Lara Strongman looks at one of the most popular works in our collection— Petrus van der Velden’s melancholy Dutch funeral procession. Lara talks about our decision to return the painting to the original title given to it by the artist.

Also in this issue, we have an extract from Peter Robinson’s interview with Tony de Lautour, whose US V THEM exhibition opened at the Gallery in early May. This interview is taken from our significant new book on de Lautour, which is available to purchase here. Our Pagework is from photographic artist Andrew Beck, My Favourite is from James Dann, who picks Tony de Lautour’s Underworld 2, and our postcard comes from André Hemer in Vienna.

Pages: 64

Dimensions: 265 x 215mm

Imprint: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū


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US V THEM: Tony de Lautour

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Director's Foreword
Director's Foreword

Director's Foreword

Welcome to the winter 2018 edition of Bulletin—my first as director of Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū.

Commentary
The World Tossed Continuously in a Riot of Colour, Form, Sound

The World Tossed Continuously in a Riot of Colour, Form, Sound

One hundred and twenty five years ago, after years of political struggle, Aotearoa New Zealand granted all adults the right to vote by extending suffrage to women. To mark this anniversary, for this issue of Bulletin our curators have written about some of the Gallery’s significant – yet lesser-known – nineteenth and mid-twentieth-century works by women. Our intention is to make these paintings, and the cultural contribution of the artists, more visible in 2018.

Artist interview
Driving  Without a Licence

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Heading along to the stunning Rita Angus: Life & Vision survey exhibition at the Gallery in 2009 I always had this nagging feeling that one work was missing from the walls – Angus’s Gasworks from 1933. This painting was one that I knew only through the black and white image that appeared first in a volume of Art in New Zealand in 1933; the same reproduction that was later used in Jill Trevelyan’s excellent biography of Angus and also in the catalogue for the National Art Gallery’s 1982 retrospective, Rita Angus. For the New Zealand art historian, Gasworks was a kind of legend – painted by one of the country’s best artists yet seen in person by only a very few. In 1975, when Gordon H. Brown curated New Zealand Painting 1920–1940: Adaption and Nationalism, Gasworks was listed as ‘location unknown’ in the accompanying catalogue. Amazingly the painting was also not included in the retrospective exhibition of 1982. We had grown to know this painting purely through a grainy black and white illustration from 1933. But the painting was never lost – Gasworks is a painting that has been cherished, protected and loved by the same Christchurch family since the early 1940s. And now, having been placed on loan to Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, it is available for the public to view for the first time since 1933, when it was shown at the Canterbury Society of Arts.

Postcard From...
Postcard From...

Postcard From...

My main base is in Vienna although I’ve lived a reasonably nomadic life for quite some time now. The last time that I lived in New Zealand was back in 2011, and I left just a few days after the earthquake to start a PhD in Sydney. After four years in Australia I did a couple of residencies in Paris and Italy before moving to Vienna.

My Favourite
Tony de Lautour's Underworld 2

Tony de Lautour's Underworld 2

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Commentary
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Notes
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