B.191

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ISBN: 1176-0540

Magazine

In this issue, Roger Collins looks at the Pacific etchings of eighteenth-century French artist Charles Meryon, who sailed around New Zealand on the Rhin, visiting the French settlement of Akaroa in 1843. And Lara Strongman talks to prominent British artist John Stezaker, who is known for his distinctive, often deceptively simple, collages. Resolutely analogue in a digital era, he works with scalpel and glue, slicing images and joining them together in new configurations. We also hear from Gwynneth Porter and Ani O’Neill, who talk about the collaborative nature of work. Pagework comes from Holly Best, who recently featured in our Devil’s Blind Spot exhibition; My Favourite is by Victor Rodger, who finds familiarity and past adventures in another work from that same exhibition, our recent purchase Seta by Ane Tonga. Our Postcard comes from former Gallery guide, Margaux Warne, who revels in some of Paris’s smaller museums and galleries.

In this issue also, art historian and curator, Priscilla Pitts, considers trends in collecting for Christchurch’s public art collection during Jenny harper’s time here as the Gallery’s director; and Christina Barton, director of the Adam Art Gallery, writes of working with and knowing Jenny for a number of years.

Pages: 64

Imprint: Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū


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McCahon gave There is only one direction to the renowned writer James K. Baxter and his wife Jacqueline, marking the friendship between the two families and McCahon’s position as godfather to their young daughter Hilary. The painting sat above Baxter’s writing desk for many years.

(Unseen: The Changing Collection, 18 December 2015 – 19 June 2016)

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John Stezaker: Lost World

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Director's Foreword
Director's Foreword

Director's Foreword

Welcome to Christchurch Art Gallery’s first Bulletin of 2018, B.191.

In this issue, Roger Collins looks at the Pacific etchings of eighteenth-century French artist Charles Meryon, who sailed around New Zealand on the Rhin, visiting the French settlement of Akaroa in 1843. Meryon continued to create images of the South Pacific throughout his life as exemplars of a possible alternative to the ‘social hell of a great European city’.

Artist Profile
Charles Meryon: Etcher of Banks Peninsula

Charles Meryon: Etcher of Banks Peninsula

French explorers, natural historians, whalers and Catholic missionaries were increasingly present in the south-west Pacific from the mid-eighteenth century, but there was also a political thread in this activity. During the 1820s some in France saw New Zealand as a potential penal colony, and the project that saw a handful of French colonists settle on Banks Peninsula in 1840 made an official French presence in the region even more appropriate. This took the form of a French naval base, the ‘New Zealand station’, established at Akaroa in 1840.

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Sometimes Going Back Is A Way Of Going Forward

Sometimes Going Back Is A Way Of Going Forward

John Stezaker is an English conceptual artist, acknowledged as a significant influence on the YBA generation. He has been working since the mid-1970s, while achieving international acclaim for his work in the past fifteen years. His exhibition Lost World opens at Christchurch Art Gallery in March 2018. He spoke to senior curator Lara Strongman on a visit to Aotearoa New Zealand in August 2017.

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Raising the Stakes

Raising the Stakes

On the opening of the Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū Jenny Harper, then at Victoria University Wellington, wrote that the challenge for the newly opened Gallery was ‘to raise the stakes by acknowledging it is no longer the McDougall but is poised to become the force in the New Zealand art scene that Christchurch deserves.’ When, three years later, she became director of the Gallery, that’s exactly what she set out to achieve on several fronts. One of those was developing the collection.

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Zero Degrees of Separation

Zero Degrees of Separation

The New Zealand art world is an intimate place but my connection to Jenny Harper runs deeper than the usual bonds of a small community. Admitting this is a necessary disclaimer. I’m not an objective commentator; Jenny is family, literally. And professionally, I owe her plenty. What follows are some personal recollections about the Jenny I know through the associations we share, on the occasion of her imminent departure from the Christchurch Art Gallery, where she has been director since October 2006, making this the longest role in her distinguished career.

My Favourite
Ane Tonga's Seta

Ane Tonga's Seta

There’s a moment in my play Black Faggot when a gay Samoan man describes the moment he sees ‘this fine chocolate piece of mmmmmm’ on the dancefloor at a nightclub.

‘…he looked over at me and then he smiled and then I was like, Damn, he’s a Tongan. He had a mouthful of gold in there…’

Notes
Award wins!

Award wins!

We’re delighted to announce that Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū has won a number of accolades at the 21st Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards. The prestigious annual awards celebrate excellence in the Australasian museum sector and were presented on Tuesday evening during a gala dinner in Melbourne.