Fiona Pardington

Aotearoa New Zealand, b.1961
Ngāi Tahu, Clan Cameron, Ngāti Māmoe

Still Life with Barley Grass and Freesia, Waiheke

  • Gift of Sheelagh Thompson marking her 86th birthday and honouring director Jenny Harper's dedication to Christchurch Art Gallery during the five years of its closure after the 2010-11 Canterbury earthquakes.
  • Epson hot press natural 320gsm colour photograph
  • 1402 x 1760mm
  • 2016/020
  • 2011-2012

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Related

My Favourite
Fiona Pardington’s Still Life with Barley Grass and Freesia, Waiheke

Fiona Pardington’s Still Life with Barley Grass and Freesia, Waiheke

The most magical book I held in my hands as a child was called Ratsmagic, and it belonged to my sister. It was a dark, threatening masterpiece of a picture book, in which a bluebird is kidnapped by a witch, right when she is due to lay her egg. The animals in the valley where she lives whisper to one another “Bluebird is with egg, BLUEBIRD IS WITH EGG” with a fierce and mythological importance. A clever rat is sent to save her from her terrible fate.

Director's Foreword
Another Big Step Forward

Another Big Step Forward

Since mid July we’ve been enjoying the first major exhibition change downstairs. While it was difficult to say goodbye to Unseen and Op + Pop – and to be rid of the colourful castor sugar (some 600kg were required) with which Tanya Schultz made Pip & Pop’s Newest New World – it’s now so rewarding to be the final venue for City Gallery Wellington’s exhibition of Kāi Tahu photographer Fiona Pardington’s A Beautiful Hesitation. Designing the display and augmenting the content of this show for our audiences feels like another big step towards being fully operational.

Commentary
The Camera as a Place of Potential

The Camera as a Place of Potential

To Māori, the colour black represents Te Korekore – the realm of potential being, energy, the void, and nothingness. The notion of potential and the presence of women are what I see when I peek at Fiona Pardington’s 1997 work Moko. And I say peek deliberately, because I am quite mindful of this work – it is downright spooky. Moko is a photographic rendering of a seeping water stain upon the blackboard in Pardington’s studio, taken while she was the recipient of the Frances Hodgkins Fellowship in Dunedin in 1997.

Commentary
Beyond The Fields We Know

Beyond The Fields We Know

In the canons of received taste, the unicorn figurine doesn’t rank terribly highly beyond kitsch. Sitting in your hand, it’s cutesy, twee, trivial and quaint (though a piece of master-worked Venetian glass from Murano is a pricey and collectable item).

Notes
Largest ever Fiona Pardington exhibition opens in Christchurch

Largest ever Fiona Pardington exhibition opens in Christchurch

Death, sex, flesh and the female gaze are among the many themes explored in the Gallery’s newest exhibition, Fiona Pardington: A Beautiful Hesitation.

Notes
Mauria mai, tono ano by Fiona Pardington

Mauria mai, tono ano by Fiona Pardington

This article first appeared in The Press on 11 May 2005