Notes
Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Te Puna o Waiwhetū Christchurch Art Gallery is launching its exclusive new art-wine and an art-beer at Art Do – the new gallery gala. 

Supporter
Renee Walker

Renee Walker
Christchurch Art Gallery Foundation

I joined the Foundation in 2014, not because I’m an art aficionado or collector, but because it was a chance to contribute to our city’s regeneration. As a Foundation, we didn’t want to follow the traditional way of doing things. Instead, we concentrated on using our diverse networks to build relationships based on loyalty and art. We asked people to engage and believe. As a result, we’ve preserved art in the hearts and minds of long-standing Christchurch residents as well as a new generation of Cantabrians. I’m incredibly proud to be part of that.

Notes
Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Come hungry and do dinner – a collection of contemporary food stations cooked up by some of the best and brightest in the business will feed you at Art Do

Exhibition
Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Delightful observations of character and place, from rural Canterbury to bustling 1950s London.

Notes
Award wins!

Award wins!

We’re delighted to announce that Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū has won a number of accolades at the 21st Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards. The prestigious annual awards celebrate excellence in the Australasian museum sector and were presented on Tuesday evening during a gala dinner in Melbourne.

Collection
Ersatz (Sick Child)
Ronnie van Hout Ersatz (Sick Child)

It’s always a mistake to look at an autobiographical work and assume the artist is speaking directly about the events of his or her own life. For the past couple of decades, Ronnie van Hout has used his own likeness, and sometimes his childhood memories of growing up in the Christchurch suburb of Aranui, as the starting point for his work. The figures are him, but they’re not him. “It’s a form of acting, a kind of masking”, he’s said. “I’m interested in childhood and revisiting sites of the past. It’s very hard to go back. But in the visual arts, things stand for things; they’re not the actual things, they’re just in place of. You’re pointing to something that points to something else.”

Ersatz is a German word meaning stand-in or replacement. It’s typically used to refer to something that’s of inferior quality than the original. Ersatz coffee, for example, is something that isn’t coffee at all. Ersatz (Sick Child) is one of a number of ‘sick children’ that van Hout has made in his own likeness. Each wears boy-sized pyjamas but has the head and hands (and in this one’s case, also the grubby feet) of a full-grown man. He leans precariously against the wall on two legs of a chair, as if eavesdropping on adults in another room. The silence is filled with his own whiny voice emanating from the speech bubble-shaped speaker above him, as if his need to be noticed were drowning out even his own thoughts: “Look at me. Listen to me. Pay me. Pay me your attention.” Works of art always demand your attention, but this one has the temerity to say it out loud.

(Your Hotel Brain 13 May 2017 - 8 July 2018)

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