Notes
Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Te Puna o Waiwhetū Christchurch Art Gallery is launching its exclusive new art-wine and an art-beer at Art Do – the new gallery gala. 

Supporter
Stu Roberts, ANZ Private

Stu Roberts, ANZ Private
Foundation Partner

ANZ Private is really proud to sponsor Christchurch Art Gallery Foundaiton, and support Christchurch.

It’s wonderful to be able to bring quality art to Christchurch and have it accessible to everyone.

Notes
Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Come hungry and do dinner – a collection of contemporary food stations cooked up by some of the best and brightest in the business will feed you at Art Do

Exhibition
Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Delightful observations of character and place, from rural Canterbury to bustling 1950s London.

Notes
Award wins!

Award wins!

We’re delighted to announce that Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū has won a number of accolades at the 21st Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards. The prestigious annual awards celebrate excellence in the Australasian museum sector and were presented on Tuesday evening during a gala dinner in Melbourne.

Collection
Dry September
William Sutton Dry September

In 1930s New Zealand there was wide discussion about what was unique about the New Zealand situation; what it was that made us different from the rest of the world. Artists and writers began exploring ways to identify our national identity. A number of artists began painting the Canterbury High Country, most famously Rita Angus and her landscape painting of the railway station at Cass. One reviewer in 1936 observed that there was a new quality in the landscapes exhibited in Christchurch that seemed ‘to consist in a removal of the romantic mists which used to obscure mountains and the Canterbury countryside generally. The light now is clear and hard, the colours are in flat planes, and the effect is of seeing the country through a gem-like atmosphere. There is also a new romantic standpoint – an insistence on the isolation and brooding loneliness of the hills.’ It’s a statement that certainly rings true with the Canterbury paintings of Rita Angus, Leo Bensemann, Louise Henderson, Rata Lovell-Smith and Bill Sutton.

(March 2018)

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