Notes
Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Te Puna o Waiwhetū Christchurch Art Gallery is launching its exclusive new art-wine and an art-beer at Art Do – the new gallery gala. 

Supporter
Garth Gallaway, Chapman Tripp

Garth Gallaway, Chapman Tripp
Gallery partner

I am an art fanatic and an obsessive collector.

Art has played an essential role in Christchurch’s rejuvenation since the earthquake. The Galley has done an incredible job in establishing the art pop-ups around the city. It’s part of a social record – the art we have seen will form a really important part of the history of the city.

Read more about Garth's obsession with collecting here.

Notes
Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Come hungry and do dinner – a collection of contemporary food stations cooked up by some of the best and brightest in the business will feed you at Art Do

Exhibition
Trusttum: Just a Glimpse

Trusttum: Just a Glimpse

Exuberant and boisterous, these large paintings by Philip Trusttum will lift the spirits

Notes
Award wins!

Award wins!

We’re delighted to announce that Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū has won a number of accolades at the 21st Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards. The prestigious annual awards celebrate excellence in the Australasian museum sector and were presented on Tuesday evening during a gala dinner in Melbourne.

Collection
The Drawbridge, Plate VII (second state) from the series Invenzioni Capric di Carceri
Giovanni Battista Piranesi The Drawbridge, Plate VII (second state) from the series Invenzioni Capric di Carceri

Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s The Drawbridge is one of sixteen plates from a folio of prints depicting imaginary prisons that has repeatedly haunted and inspired writers, artists and architects for over two and a half centuries. Three of Piranesi’s Carceri engravings, for example, were included in Alfred H. Barr’s exhibition Fantastic Art, Dada, Surrealism at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in 1936.

First issued in 1749–50, but attracting little attention to begin with, the series was republished with heavily reworked plates in 1761, yielding darker, more detailed and more resolved prints that brought an attendant increase to their public reception and acclaim. (Above ground, 2015)

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