Notes
Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Thirsty? Drink Up This Limited Edition Art Do News

Te Puna o Waiwhetū Christchurch Art Gallery is launching its exclusive new art-wine and an art-beer at Art Do – the new gallery gala. 

Supporter
Monica Ryan

Monica Ryan
Christchurch Art Gallery Foundation

I grew up with an interest in art and this interest was accelerated through my early involvement in a special and well informed art group. One of my favourite pieces is Fanfare by Neil Dawson, particularly when it is lit up or glistening in the sun. It creates a dynamic entrance to Christchurch. I joined the board in 2008 and especially enjoy being involved in the art community in Christchurch and contributing in a real way. Working with like-minded people in the city.

Notes
Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Meet The Creative Culinary Team Behind Art Do

Come hungry and do dinner – a collection of contemporary food stations cooked up by some of the best and brightest in the business will feed you at Art Do

Exhibition
Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Juliet Peter: Where the Line Leads

Delightful observations of character and place, from rural Canterbury to bustling 1950s London.

Notes
Award wins!

Award wins!

We’re delighted to announce that Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū has won a number of accolades at the 21st Museums Australasia Multimedia & Publication Design Awards. The prestigious annual awards celebrate excellence in the Australasian museum sector and were presented on Tuesday evening during a gala dinner in Melbourne.

Collection
Cabbage Tree in Flower
Russell Clark Cabbage Tree in Flower

The cabbage tree is a distinctive New Zealand subject and this painting belongs to a series on these trees that Russell Clark began in 1953. He commented that he found cabbage tree shapes satisfying. “They are good paintable objects.” Clark has used a modified cubist style, with concern for the geometric qualities of the cabbage tree, particularly its angular leaves. He has kept to a very limited palette, using basically only three or four distinct colours.

Clark was born in Christchurch. In 1929 he moved to Dunedin where he worked as a commercial artist for the publishing firm John McIndoe. He went to Wellington in 1938 and worked as an illustrator for the New Zealand Listener. Clark was Official War Artist during World War II and served in the Pacific. He returned to Wellington, but in 1947 moved to Christchurch where he joined the staff of the School of Art. As senior lecturer in painting Clark became an important influence on a generation of Canterbury artists.

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